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PUBLIC DOCUMENT . . . . 



. ... No. 45. 



> 



NINTH ANNUAL EEPORT 



or THK 



BO^RD 



Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commissioners, 



POR THE 



Year ending September 30, 1897. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1898. 




mtuititiaLtAs 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 45. 



NINTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



07 THE 



BO^RD 



OF 



Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commissioners, 



TO 9, TRr. 



I • a > 9 » • o 



Year en^ding Sei>tem55sr 30, 1897. 



• I « ' 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 

1898. 






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Commaiitoealllj of glassEt^us^tts. 



To the Honorable the Senate and the House of Representatives. 

The Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, 
created by chapter 439, Acts of 1889, presents its annual 
report, which is the ninth since its organization, and covers 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. 

In our report for 1896 (Public Document No. 45, 1897) 
the practical completion of the north metropolitan system 
was announced. Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1896, as 
amended by chapter 88 of the Acts of 1897, authorized the 
extension of this system to include a portion of the town 
of Wakefield, and made an appropriation therefor; while 
chapter 436 of the Acts of the latter year authorized and 
instructed this Board to provide an additional outlet for the 
town of Stonebam, and provided the means therefor. Both 
of these branches will be found more fully treated of under 
the north metropolitan system, sections 50 and 51. In our 
fourth annual report (Public Document No. 45, 1^93) this 
Board announced that " the Charles River valley system has 
been completed and in use since early in April" (1892). 

The work of construction has progressed steadily upon the 
Neponset valley system, and many of the sections thereon 
that were in the course of construction at the time our last 
report was rendered have been completed, while contracts 
have been made during the year for the remaining sections 
upon this system, and some of these sections are also com- 
pleted at this time (Oct. 1, 1897). Your attention is called 
to the report of our chief engineer, and the tables following 
in connection with this report, for fuller details. 



iv METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 



NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

The following settlements for land taken upon this system 
have been made during the year : — 

By deed of release, dated the 8th of October, 1896, 
Stephen P. Weld for himself, and as trustee, releases to the 
Commonwealth ''all my claims and demands for damages" 
and ** all claims and demands of Saml. B. Whittemore" and 
others, for a taking made by this Board, dated Jan. 7, 1893, 
and recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 
2 169, page 457. Weld's deed is recorded in Middlesex South 
District Deeds, book 2569, page 242, and is accompanied by 
two other deeds, one from Saml. B. Whittemore, trustee, and 
others, assigning to said Weld '' all and singular our claims 
and demands against the Commonwealth " by reason of said 
taking. This deed is recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, book 2569, page 241. A further quit-claim from 
Saml. B. Whittemore and Grace T., his wife, of the land 
included within said taking, accompanies deed of said Weld, 
being recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 
2569, page 244. These deeds cover a strip of land along 
Ale wife Brook in Cambridge, near where it crosses North 
Avenue in said city. A deed of Louville V. Niles, dated 
Nov. 2, 1896, releases rights in land in Winchester in- 
cluded within a taking made by this Board July 14, 1893, 
and recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 
2210, page 162. Said deed from Niles is recorded in Mid- 
dlesex South District Deeds, book 2539, page 336. And 
the said Louville V. Niles, by deed dated Nov. 2, 1896, 
releases to the Commonwealth rights in a certain parcel of 
land in said Winchester included within a taking made by 
this Board June 2, 1894, and recorded with Middlesex South 
District Deeds, book 2282, page 388. The latter deed of 
Niles is recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 
2539, page 334, and is accompanied by a deed from Clara 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. v 

B. Kimball to said Niles of rights in a certain strip of land 
in the town of Winchester included within the same taking, 
which deed is recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, 
book 2539, page 333. The first deed of said Niles includes 
land on Abbajona River in Winchester, and the second deed 
includes the land taken from Clara B. Kimball by the afore- 
said taking, dated June 2, 1894, in said Winchester. Mary 
E. Davren of Cambridge, by deed dated Dec. 11, 18ii6, 
releases to the Commonwealth land in Cambridge included 
within a taking made by this Board Feb. 6, 1893, recorded 
with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2174, page 219. 
The said deed is recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, book 2539, page 342. Samuel H. Holt of Cam- 
bridge, by a deed dated Dec. 30, 1896, and recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2539, page 341, 
releases to the Commonwealth land in said Cambridge in- 
cluded within a taking made July 19, 1893, and recorded 
with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2210, page 481. 
Charles Foster also releases to the Commonwealth by deed 
dated Jan. 11, 1897, recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, book 2539, page 340, land in Cambridge included 
within the same taking. Settlement was made with the Bay 
State Brick Company for damages to land in Cambridge 
included in taking dated Jan. 7, 1893, and recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2169, page 457, the 
said company at its request being allowed to give the Board 
a satisfactory receipt for the money paid. Walter Russell 
and others, by deed dated April 21, 1897, release to the 
Commonwealth ''rights, privileges and easements" inland 
in Arlington included within a taking made by this Board 
April 27, 1895, and recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, book 2361, page 45. The said deed is recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2559, page 306. 
George A. Blaney and others, by deed dated May 15, 1897, 
also release the Commonwealth for damages by reason of a 
taking made at the same time of land in Somerville. The 
latter deed is recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, 
book 2569, page 246. 

Damages sustained by sundry persons in their real estate 
included within takings made at various times by this Board 



vi METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

were paid by the Commonwealth upon executions issued from 
the superior court, as follows: January, 1897, Edmund 
Reardon, Cambridge, included within a taking made Feb. 6, 
1893, and recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, 
book 2174, page 219. For this the Commonwealth has 
received a release from said Reardon, which is recorded with 
the aforesaid Registry, book 2539, page 337. On this sec- 
tion the Commonwealth has also received from said Reardon 
a release of land belonging at the time of taking to Michael 
J. Egan, which release is recorded with Middlesex South 
District Deeds, book 2559, page 304, and is accompanied by 
a deed from said Egan to Reardon, assigning all claims for 
damage to him. The last deed is recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, book 2559, page 303. In the same 
manner the Commonwealth settled with said Reardon for 
two parcels of land included within the taking dated March 
25, 1893, and recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, 
book 2183, page 245. A deed from Edmund Reardon, re- 
corded with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2539, 
page 338, releases to the Commonwealth land included in 
one lot, while a deed from Ellen M. Reardon, his wife, 
recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2539, 
page 339, releases land on said section included in another 
lot. March, 1897, Cochrane Carpet Company, Maiden, and 
John Cochrane, Jr., Maiden, included within a taking re- 
corded with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2124, 
page 123. Samuel Cabot, for damage to his lamp-black 
factory on Marginal Street, East Boston, said street being 
included within a takinor dated Aug 1, 1891, recorded with 
Suffolk Deeds, book 2010, page 474. Said Cabot claimed 
damage to his factory on said street by reason of the con- 
struction of the sewer therein. 

Land TJiaNOS. 

In our last report, page xix, in speaking of the extension 
of this system to Wakefield, we called attention to the fact 
that our engineer considered the appropriation of thirty thou- 
sand dollars too small, and we recommended that the addi- 
tional sum of five thousand dollars be appropriated. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. vii 

Chapter 88 of the Acts of 1897 made the additional 
appropriation asked for, and enabled this Board to pay for 
so much of the local sewer in Melrose constructed by said 
town, and described in chapter 414 of the Acts of 189H for 
the extension of the sewer to Wakefield. On Nov. 21, 1896, 
this Board executed a deed, recorded with Middlesex South 
District Deeds, hook 2515, page 545, taking **for the said 
Commonwealth the sewers owned by the town of Melrose and 
already constructed under the following-described lands, all 
situated in said Melrose, in the county of Middlesex, and the 
right to carry and conduct under the said lands and therein to 
construct, to operate and forever to maintain an underground 
main sewer and connecting sewers, drains, man-holes and 
underground appurtenances, and to repair and renew the 
same ; " through Wyoming Avenue and Hurd Street, cross- 
ing the location of the Boston & Maine Railroad to Berwick 
Street; thence via Berwick, Grove, Myrtle and Essex 
streets to the northerly line of Emerson Street at its junc- 
tion with Tremont Street, and in said Tremont Street to the 
northerly line of Lake Avenue produced, as shown on three 
plans of even date recorded with the taking. On April 24, 
1897, the Board executed a deed taking an easement in lands 
and streets situated mostly in Melrose and partly in Wake- 
field necessary for constructing an extension of the metropol- 
itan sewerage system to the villages of Greenwood and Boyn- 
tonville, under the provisions of chapter 414, Acts of 1896, 
which deed is recorded with Middlesex South District Deeds, 
book 2559, page 301. The Board was further instructed by 
chapter 436, Acts of 1897, to construct branch sewers in 
Melrose to the Stoneham line, as an additional outlet for the 
sewage of the town of Stoneham, and in accordance with 
said instructions executed on July 17, 1897, a deed, recorded 
with Middlesex South District Deeds, book 2581, page 353, 
taking the right of way necessary for said sewer, as shown on 
plans drawn by Wm. M. Brown, Jr., chief engineer, of even 
date, and recorded with said taking. 

The Legislature of 1897 also passed an act, chapter 520, 
Acts of 1897, providing ** for the addition of a portion of 
the town of Lexington to the metropolitan sewerage sys- 
tem," which was approved on June 11 of that year. Section 



viii METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

11 of said act provides that it ''shall take eflfect upon its 
acceptance by a vote of a majority of the legal voters of said 
town of Lexington present and voting thereon at a legal 
meeting called for that purpose within one year from the 
date of its passage." 

This Board has never been notified of the acceptance of 
said act by the town of Lexington, but are informed that the 
said town intends to seek amendments thereto from the 
present Legislature. By the aforesaid act seventy thousand 
dollars was appropriated to carry out the provisions thereof, 
but, as this Board has received no notice of its acceptance, 
the work has not been entered upon. 

Contracts. 

Contracts for the construction of sections 50 (Wakefield 
branch) and 51 (Stoneham branch) are the only contracts 
for construction made by this Board on this system during 
the past year. Bids for the former were received and 
opened April 24, 1897, a full list of which will be found in 
Table A of the Appendix. The bids for the latter were 
received and opened on July 3, 1897, and Table A of the 
Appendix shows the bids received at that time. On the 
former section the Board at its meeting on May 1, 1897, 
accepted the bid of the John Booth Company, and fixed 
the bond at $3,000; this was furnished, with the American 
Surety Company of New York as surety, and the contract 
duly executed. On section 51 the A. W. Bryne Construc- 
tion Company, the lowest bidder, was awarded the contract, 
and furnished surety, consisting of Wm. Gr. Nash of Somer- 
ville and E. O. Glidden of Cambridge, for $1,500, which 
was duly accepted by the Board, and the contract executed 
with them for the construction of the section. 

These two sections add about 2| miles to this system, and 
will probably be completed early in January (1898). When 
they are completed there will be about 45.65 miles of sewer 
in this system. 

The engineer's report herewith contains a full account of 
the progress of the work on said sections. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. ix 

Other Contracts. 

On July 1, 1897, a contract was executed with the Vacuum 
Oil Company for two years for supplying the oil to be used 
at the various pumping stations, and at various times con- 
tracts have been executed for supplying said pumping sta- 
tions with the necessary coal for operating the same. Table 
A in the Appendix contains a list of bids received at various 
times for the purchase of coal. 

The following contract with John P. Squire & Co., owners 
of a slauijhterino: establishment in Cambridore and Somer- 
ville, and similar contracts with the New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Company and the North Packing and Pro- 
vision Company, both of Somerville, were after due consid- 
eration executed by this Board the twenty-eighth day of 
October, 189(), and were all of them placed on record in 
Middlesex South District Registry, as follows : that of John 
P. Squire & Co., book 2510, pages 424 to 428 inclusive; 
that of the North Packing and Provision Company, book 
2510, pages 420 to 424 inclusive ; that of the New England 
Dressed Meat and Wool Company, book 2510, pages 429 to 
432 inclusive. In each case a plan showing the premises 
accompanies the contract. We give a copy of the contract 
with John P. Squire & Co., the others containing the same 
general provisions : — 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts by the Board of 
Metropolitan Sewer Commissioners and the John P. 
Squire & Co., a Corporation organized under the Laws 
of the State of Maine, agree with Each Other as 

FOLLOWS : — 

I. 

This agreement is la reference to the disposal and conducting 
into the metropolitan sewer of the sewage and waste water from 
the premises of said company, situated partly in Somerville and 
partly in Cambridge, in the county of Middlesex. The output 
into sewers from said premises and from the establishments of 
said company thereon shall be considered as divided into three 
classes : first, sewage, which term, as used in this agreement, shall 
be construed and understood to mean what is generally understood 
by the term " sewage," namely, water polluted within said premises 
or establishments and such polluted water as is ordinarily dis- 
charged into sewers ; second, waste water, which term shall be 



X METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

construed and understood to mean salt water or other water, used 
with engines, condensors, refrigerating apparatus, or for cooling 
or other purposes, with any apparatus or machinery, or conducted 
through and out of the premises in pipes without being discharged 
within the premises and polluted therein, or, in general, water 
which is discharged from the premises in the same condition, as 
to purity, as it was in when it entered the premises ; third, surface 
water, which term shall be construed and understood to mean roof 
water and water falling upon the surface of the ground. It will 
further explain the meaning of said term " waste water," and one 
object of this agreement, to say that said company now uses large 
quantities of salt water, brought through its own pipes from 
Miller's River, for condensing purposes and with its engines and 
refrigerating apparatus, which water is discharged into the sewers ; 
and the principal object of this agreement is to keep such of said 
water as is waste water, as hereinbefore defined, or any substitute 
therefor, out of the metropolitan sewer, when the Board of Metro- 
politan Sewer Commissioners shall, as hereinafter provided, be of 
the opinion that such metropolitan sewer should no longer, either 
directly, or indirectly through other sewers, receive such waste 
water. 

II. 

Referring to the plan, hereto annexed as a part hereof, and 
marked "Plan A," said sewage and wastewater are to be con- 
ducted into the metropolitan sewer through an independent sewer 
and an independent connection (that is to say, independent of the 
present sewers of the city of Somerville) , it being understood that 
independent sewers are to be constructed by said city outside of 
the premises of the hereinafter-named companies for conducting 
away into the metropolitan sewer the sewage and waste water from 
the premises of said company and of the New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Company and the North Packing and Provision 
Company, as shown and laid down on said plan, said Board of 
Metropolitan Sewer Commissioners having given their consent that 
the city of Somerville may construct such independent connection 
and the connections of the Somerville sewers with the metropol- 
itan sewer, in the manner as shown and laid down on said plan. 
Said surface water is not to go into and through said independent 
connection, but is to be conducted into the present sewers of the 
city of Somerville, and thus through them ultimately into the met- 
ropolitan sewer. 

III. 

The Commonwealth is to pay no part of the expenses of any 
sewers or connections referred to in this agreement, such expenses 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xi 

to be arranged for between said company and said city of Somer- 
ville, as such company and city may determine. 

IV. 

Said company is to pay to the Commonwealth the sum of one 
dollar for every million gallons of waste water from the premises 
or establishments of said company, which may flow or be dis- 
charged (either immediately or ultimately through other sewers) 
into the metropolitan sewer, the quantity to be ascertained and 
computed by the engineer of the Metropolitan Sewer Commis- 
sion, in such manner as he shall deem best, and bills to be pre- 
sented by the Commonwealth to said company semi-annually. All 
waste water shall be conducted into and through man-holes, to be 
built by said company and on its premises at or near the outlet 
point of each waste water pipe into the sewer, details of the con- 
struction and location of such manholes to be subject to the 
approval of the engineer of said Board. Said Board by its 
engineer or other agent shall be allowed free access at all reason- 
able times upon the premises of said company to said man-holes 
or waste water pipes, for the purpose of determining the quantity 
of waste water, by any such means as said Board shall deem ex- 
pedient. All the sewage and waste water from the said premises, 
works and establishments of said company shall be conducted and 
discharge into said independent sewers and connections to be 
constructed for that purpose as aforesaid : provided, however, that 
the ordinary sewage and roof water (but not including waste 
water, as defined in this agreement) from the buildings, shown 
on the plan hereto annexed, marked " Plan B," and colored red 
thereon, will continue to be discharged, as at present, into the 
public sewers of said city. 

V. 

When said Board shall be of opinion that the metropolitan 
sewer cannot or should not longer accommodate and receive said 
waste water, it shall in writing so notify the said company, and 
to withdraw the waste water from the sewer ; and said company 
shall within six months from the receipt by it of such notice cut 
off all connection of waste water pipes with the sewers and prevent 
all waste water from then or at any time thereafter discharging 
directly, or indirectly through other sewers, into the metropolitan 
sewer ; and if said company shall not so do within said six months, 
said Board, by its engineer or other agent, may enter at all reason- 
able times upon the premises of said company and at the outlet 
points of the waste water pipes cut off all connection of waste 
water pipes with sewers, and by such means as it may deem 



xii METEOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

necessary or proper prevent all waste water from then or at any 
time thereafter discharging directly, or indirectly through other 
sewers, into the metropolitan sewer ; and after the expiration of 
said six months said company shall take charge of and itself dis- 
pose of said waste water, and not cause or allow it to be discharged 
directly, or indirectly through other sewers, into the metropolitan 
sewer, or so that it shall in any way ultimately reach the metro- 
politan sewer, but said sewage shall continue to discharge through 
said independent connection without charge to said company. 
Said company shall at all times keep its waste- water pipes distinct 
from its sewage pipes, until the waste-water pipes shall reach said 
man-holes, where they are to empty into the sewage pipes. Said 
company may discontinue the discharge of waste water into the 
metropolitan sewer by giving to said Metropolitan Sewer Com- 
missioners one month's notice in writing. 

VI. 

The words ••' said company," as used in this agreement, refer to 
the said John P. Squire & Co. 

In witness whereof, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
by Hosea Kingman, Tilly Haynes and Board of Metropolitan 
Sewer Commissioners, has hereunto set its name, and the said 
John P. Squire & Co. has caused its corporate seal to be hereto 
aflSxed and these presents to be signed in its name and behalf by 
Frank O. Squire, its president, and Fred F. Squire, its treasurer, 
this twenty-eighth day of October in the year eighteen hundred 

and ninety-six. 

(Signed) JOHN P. SQUIRE & CO., 

By (Signed) Frank O. Squire, 

[corporate seal.] President. 

(Signed) JOHN P. SQUIRE & CO., 

By (Signed) Fred F. Squire, 

Treasurer, 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, 
By (Signed) Hosea Kingman, 

(Signed) Tilly Haynes, 

Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, 
Witness to H. K., T. H. 

(Signed) Herbert E. Brayton. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Suffolk, ss. Oct. 28, 1896. 

Then personally appeared the above-named Frank O. Squire and Fred F. Squire, 

and acknowledged the foregoing instrument to be the free act and deed of John P. 

Squire & Co. 

Before me (Signed) "Ward C. Mansfield, 

Justice of the Peace. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xiii 

At a meeting of the directors of John P. Squire & Co., 
duly notified and held at Boston on the twenty-seventh day 
of October, A.D. 1896, and at which meeting a quorum was 
present, the foregoing instrument having been read and con- 
sidered, the following vote was passed : — 

Voted, That the president, Frank O. Squire, and the treasurer, 
Fred F. Squire, are hereby authorized and instructed to sign, seal 
with the corporate seal, execute and deliver (and that either of 
said officers is authorized to acknowledge), in the name and behalf 
of the corporation, the agreement which has just been read, be- 
tween the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the corporation. 
Attest: (Signed) John P. Wyman, 

Clerk of John P. Squire & Co. 
By W. L. Hill, 

Clerk pro tern. 

In July last bills were rendered the various companies as 
follows : — 

John P. Squire & Co., f 217 20 

North Packing and Provision Company, . . . 123 44 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool Company, . 11 95 

$352 59 

These were paid by check to the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth, and by him placed to the credit of the maintenance 
account of the north metropolitan system. 

On May 15, 1897, by vote of the Board, the engineer was 
authorized to make yearly contracts for sundry small supplies. 

Final Payment on Pumping Plant. 

In our last annual report, page xxiii, we say: *« These 
reservations ($12,900 in all) due the Allis Company will be 
payable in April and June, 1897, less any expenses mean 
time." 

The reserve due was approved at said times by the Board 
and duly paid to the Allis Company. 

At its meeting on Sept. 25, 1896, the Board voted to 
authorize the running of the pumping stations continuously 
thereafter, and such has been the custom during the past 
year. The condition of the pumping plant will be found in 
the report of our chief engineer herewith. 



XIV 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



We would especially call to your attention the recom- 
mendations contained in said report regarding the purchase 
of additional pumping machinery for the various stations, to 
meet the added requirements caused by the increase in the 
flow of sewage, and recommend that an appropriation be 
made therefor. The amounts needed are as follows : for a 
new pump at Deer Island, $43,000; East Boston, $44,000; 
Charlestown, $46,000 ; and Alewife Brook pumping station, 
$9,500; making a total of $142,500. These amounts in- 
clude the placing in position, on foundations which were 
built as a part of the original construction, of one additional 
pump and engine with the necessary boilers at each of the 
pumping stations on this line. 

Connections with the Metropolitan Sewer on this 

System. 

At this date (Oct. 1, 1897) one hundred and one connec- 
tions have been authorized with the metropolitan sewer on 
this system. These connections have been made during the 
period covered by the years 1894, 1895, 1896 and 1897, the 
year in each case ending with October 1, and for the public 
benefit we publish below a complete list of the connections 
authorized on this system to date, said list being published 
by towns in alphabetical order : — 



Date 
authorized. 



City or 
Town. 



Location of Connection. 



Size. 



Date of 
Completion. 



Aug. 24, ]895, 

May 9, 1896, 

May 1, 1897, 

Mar. 2, 1895, 

Aug. 1, 1896, 

Oct. 10, 1896, 

Dec. 5, 1896, 

Mar. 27, 1897, 



Arlington, 

Arlington, 

Arlington, 

Belmont, . 
Boston,* . 

Boston,* . 

Boston,* . 
Boston,* . 



Henderson Street, at Alewife 
Brook, 

At the end of the metropolitan 
sewer in Decatur Street, . 

Broadway at Alewife Brook, near 
town line 

Near Hills Crossing, 

About 200 feet south of shaft at 
the southerly end of siphon at 
mau-hole in Alford Street, in 
the park, 

Navy Yard, on the northerly side 
of the metropolitan sewer in 
said yard, 

On Chelsea Street, opposite Vine 
Street, 

Water Street, near Wapping 
Street, 

* Charlestown district. 



10 inch, 

18 inch, 

15 inch, 
15 inch, 

15 inch, 

15 inch, 
15 inch, 
15 inch, 



Sept. 20, 1895. 

June 20, 1896. 

June 19, 1897. 
June 13, 1895. 

Sept. 28, 1896. 

Nov. 1,1896. 
Mar. 2,1897. 
To be made. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



XV 



Date 
authorized. 



City or 
Town. 



Location of Connection. 



Size. 



Date of 
Completion. 



Mar. 


27, 


1897, 


June 


19, 


1897, 


Bept. 


14, 


1895, 


Nov. 


30, 


1895, 


May 


23. 


1899, 


Deo. 


12, 


1896, 


Nov. 


28, 


1896, 


Dec. 


5, 


1898, 


Jan. 


19, 


1897, 


Jan. 


19, 


1897, 


Feb. 


13, 


1897, 


June 


12, 


1897, 


Juno 


12. 


1897, 


July 


31, 


1897, 


July 


31, 


1897, 


Aug. 


1, 


1896, 


Aug. 


1. 


1896, 


Sept. 


18, 


1897, 


Oct. 


4, 


1896, 


May 


4, 


1895, 


May 


4, 


1895, 


May 


4, 


1895, 


July 


6, 


1895, 


Aug. 


10, 


1895, 


Oct. 


4, 


1895, 


Oct. 


4, 


1895, 


Mar. 


14. 


1896, 


Mar. 


14, 


1896, 



Boston,* . 


BoBton,* . 


Boaton,t . 


Boston, t . 


Boston, t . 


Boston,! • 


Boston,! . 


Boston,! • 


Boston,! . 


Boston,! . 


Boston,! . 


Boston,! . 


Boston,! . 


Boston,! . 


Boston,! • 


Boston, § . 


Boston, § . 


Boston,§ . 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 


Cambridge, 



Chelsea Street, near Medford 
Street 



24 inch, 



Rutherford Avenue, near Dun- 
stable Street, t . . . . 

Orleans and Decatur streets,! 

Butler Avenue, Orient Heights, . 

Condor Street, near Meridian 
Street 



Border Street, near 
Street,! 



Decatur 



At the junction of Bremen and 
Porter streets,! . . . . 

Condor Street, near Meridian 
Street 

Border Street, near Butaw Street,! 

Border Street, near Lexington 
Street,! 

Butler Avenue, corner Saratoga 
Street (temporary), . 

New Street, at Sumner Street, . 

House, Bennington Street, near 
Saratoga Street 

Maverick Street, near Jeffries 
Street,! 

Maverick Street, near Cottage 
Street,! 

About Station 19+20, . 

Station 12+80 

Station 22+80 

Corner Portland and Binney 
streets, . . . . *. 

Mass. Avenue and Alewife Brook, 

Belmouth Rindge Avenue, for 
merly Spruce Street, . . 

Concord Avenue, . 

Mt. Auburn and Lowell streets, 

Mt. Auburn Street, corner Wil 
lard Street, .... 



24 inch, 


June 


25, 


1897 


16 inch. 


Oct. 


11, 


1895 


12 inch, 


Jan. 


23, 


1896 


15 inch, 


Aug 


14 


1896 


12 inch, 


Feb. 


26, 


1897 


18 inch. 


Nov. 


30, 


1896 


12 inch. 


Jan. 


26, 


1897 


12 inch, 


Apr. 


2, 


1897 



Near Concord Avenue, for Niles 
Bros.' slaughtering establish 
ment, 



Mt. Aubiirn Street, corner Haw 
thorn Street, . 

Dunster Street, 

Corner Dyke and Plympton 
streets, .... 



10 feet, 



12 inch, 



12 inch, 

12 inch, 
8 inch, 
8 inch, 
8 inch, 

48 inch, 
15 inch, 

15 inch, 
15 inch, 

27X28 in. 

12 inch, 

8 inch, 

18 inch, 
12 inch, 

30 inch, 



Mar. 30, 1897. 



Apr. 27, 1897. 



June 14, 1897. 



July 30, 1897. 

Sept. 9, 1897. 
Aug. 21,1896. 
To be made. 
To be made. 

Dec. 4, 1894. 
June 14, 1895. 

June 26, 1895. 
Aug. 21, 1895. 
Aug. 24, 1895. 

Oct. 11, 1895. 

Nov. 30, 1895. 

Dec. 12, 1895. 
June 1, 1896. 

June 30, 1896. 



♦ Charlestown district. 
t East Boston district. 



t Connected, but not in operation at this date. 
§ Deer Island. 



XVI 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Date 
authorized. 



City or 
Town. 



Location of Connection. 



Size. 



Date of 
Completion. 



Oct. 19 

July 22 

Mar. 14 

Aug. 10 

Mar. 14 

Mar. 14 

Mar. 14 

Mar. 14 

Oct. 24 

Mar. 13 

June 19 

June 19 

July 3 

Mar. 24 

April 20, 

Sept. 18 

Nov. 4 

May 5 

Aug. 25 

Nov. 3 

July 3 

May 26 

May 26 

May 26 

May 26 

Aug. 25 



Aug. 25, 1894 



1895 
1896 

1896 
1895 

1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 

1897 

1897 

1897 

1897 

1894 

1895 
1897 
1893 
1894 

1894 

1894 

1897 
1894 

1894 

1894 

1894 

1894 



Cambridge, 
Cambridge, 

Cambridge, 
Cambridge, 

Cambridge, 
Cambridge, 
Cambridge, 
Cambridge, 
Chelsea, 

Chelsea, 

Chelsea, 

Chelsea, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Everett, 
Everett, 
Maiden, 
Maiden, 

Maiden, 
Maiden, 

Maiden, 
Medford, 

Medford, 

Medford, 

Medford, 

Medford, 

Medford, 



Broobline Street, near Cottage 
Farm station, . . . . 

In private land near Alewife 
Brook near Mass. Avenue (Tan 
nery Brook connection), . 

Pearl Street, .... 

North side of Mt. Auburn Street 
at Spark Street, . 

Waverly and Talbot streets, 

Western Avenue, . 

Eliot Square, .... 

Pleasant Street, 

Second Street, near Cypress 
Street 

Second Street, near Cypress 
Street, 



Marginal Street, corner Haw 
thorn Street, 

Marginal Street, near Shurtleff 
Street 



Second Street (temporary only 
for Metropolitan Water Board), 

Under tracks of Boston & Maine 
Railroad, near East Everett sta- 
tion, 



West Everett, near Faxon's Foun- 
dry 



Second Street (temporary only 
for Metropolitan Water Board), 

Corner Charles and Middlesex 
streets, 

Extension of Pearl Street, near 
boundary line between Maiden 
and Medford 

Mountain Avenue, 

Medford Street, corner Canal 
Street, 



Jackson Street (temporary). 

Riverside Avenue, near to and 
east of Gravelly Creek, 

South side of the metropolitan 
sewer in Medford Square, 

Riverside Avenue, junction of 
Spring Street, . . . . 

Riverside Avenue, junction of 
Park and Marine avenues, 

In private land at the west end 
of Canal Street and Boston 
Avenue 

Corner of Prospect and Cottage 
streets, 



10 inch, 

15 inch, 
20 inch, 

15 inch, 
20 inch, 
22 inch, 
15 inch, 
20 inch, 

15 inch, 

6 inch, 

12 inch, 

10 inch, 



24 inch, 
20 inch, 

25X38 in. 

24 inch, 
15 inch, 
15 inch, 

12 inch, 

18 inch, 

12 inch, 

15 inch, 

12 inch, 

12 inch, 
12 inch. 



Aug. 1,1896. 



Aug. 28, 
Aug. 31 

June 24, 
Nov. 30 
Oct. 24 
Oct. 5 

Aug. 24, 

May 3 

Sept. 9 

Sept. 8 

Aug. 24 

July 3 
July 10 

Sept. 12 
Jan. 9 

May 20 
Dec. 17 
Mar. 30 

July 24 

June 18 

June 13 

Oct. 19 

Nov. 9 

Sept. 12 
Sept. 14 



1896. 
1896. 

1897. 
1896. 
1896. 
1896. 

1897. 

1897. 

1897. 

1897. 

1897. 

1894. 
1895. 
1897. 
1894. 

1894. 
1894. 
1895. 

1897. 

1894. 

1894. 

1894. 

1894. 

1894. 
1894. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



xvu 



Date 
authobized. 



city or 
Town. 



LocatioD of Connection. 

In private land, about 400 feet 
from the corner of Winthrop 
and High streets, 

Junction Middlesex Avenae and 
Third Street, Wellington dis- 
trict 

Craddocic Avenue, Wellington 
district, 

Mystic Avenue, at end of Section 
35 

nigh Street, rear of St. Joseph's 
Church 

Boston Avenue, . . . . 

Jerome Street, West Medford, . 

nouse of R. T. Howes, Prescott 
Street, near Mystic Street (tem- 
porary) 

Houses of Fuller and Forest, at a 

point about 200 feet west of 
Bradbury Avenue (temporary). 

At west end of Madison Street, . 

Rlvprside Avenue, opposite Lo- 
cust Street, 

Corner Wyoming Avenue and 
Pleasant Street 

Corner Gould and Pleasant 
streets, 

Corner Gilbert and Pleasant 
streets, 

House 45 Myrtle Street (tem- 
porary), 

At Station 29-}-05 Essex Street, . 

Myrtle Street, about 210 feet 
north of Foster Street, 

House 23 Grove Street, west of 
man-hole at Myrtle Street, 

House 19 Grove Street, near roan- 
hole at Mystic Street, 

On Mystic Avenue, at Moreland 
Street, 

Corner Mystic and Winthrop 
avenues, 

Corner Rowland and Waverly 
streets, 

Corner Somerville Avenue and 
Poplar Street 

Corner Main and Church streets, 

Common Street, .... 

Rear of freight sheds, Boston & 
Maine Railroad, . 

Near siphon at Mystic station at 
Abbajona River, . 



Size. 



Piite of 
Completion. 



Aug. 25, 1894, I Medford 



July 6, 1895 



July « 

Sept. 7 

Sept. 7 

July 1 
July 22 
April 17 

April 17 

May 15 
May 29 

July 21 

Sept. 5 

Sept. 6 

May 29 

Dec. 19 
May 1 

May 29 

May 29 

Nov. 9 

April 25 

May 16 

Sept. 19 

June 22 
June 22 
Jane 22 

Jan. 26 



1895 

1895 

1895 

1896 
1896 
1897 

1897 

1897 
1897 

1894 

1896, 
1896 

1897 

1896, 
1897 

1897 

1897 

1895 

1896 

1896 

1896 

1895 
1895 
1895 

1895 



Medford, . 

Medford, . 

Medford, . 

Medford, . 

Medford, . 
Medford, . 
Medford, . 

Medford, . 

Medford, . 
Medford, . 

Melrose, . 

Melrose, . 

Melrose, . 

Melrose, . 

Melrose, . 
Melrose, . 

Melrose, . 

Melrose, . 

Somerville, 

Somerville, 

Somerville, 

Somerville, 

Winchester, 
Winchester, 
Winchester, 

Winchester, 



12 inch, 

15 inch, 

12 inch, 

20 inch, 

10 inch, 

8 inch, 

12 inch, 

6 inch, 

6 inch, 
15 inch, 

15 inch, 

20 inch, 

15 inch, 

12 inch, 

5 Inch, 
5 inch, 

5 inch, 

5 inch, 

5 inch, 

12 inch, 

80 inch, 

24 inch, 

48 inch, 
10 inch, 
10 inch, 

15 inch, 

10 inch, 



Nov. 20, 1894. 

July 16, 1895. 

Sept. 18, 1895. 

Jan. 6, 1896. 

To be made. 
July 23, 1896. 
Oct. 29, 1896. 

May 17, 1897. 

May 17, 1897. 
July 17, 1897. 

June 26, 1897. 

Dec. 15, 1894. 

Sept. 25, 1896. 

Oct. 5,1896. 

May 19, 1897. 
Dec. 21, 1896.. 

May 11, 1897. 

May 19, 1897.. 

May 19, 1897.. 

Mar. 21, 1896.. 

May 29, 1896. 

July 21, 1896.. 

Oct. 20, 1896. 
Feb. 27, 1895. 
Feb. 27, 1896. 

Mar. 21, 1895. 

July 21, 1895. 



XVlll 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Date 
authorized. 



City or 
Town. 



Location of Connection. 



Size. 



Date of 
Completion. 



Jan. 26, 1895, Winchester, 



Oct. 3, 1896, 
Nov. 30,1895, 
Aug. 1, 1896, 

Jan. 27,1894, 

July 6, 1895, 

Oct. 12, 1895, 
July 22, 1896, 
May 25, 1895, 
Sept. 7, 1895, 

July 6, 1895, 



Winchester, 
Winchester, 
Winchester, 

Winthrop, 

Winthrop, 

Winthrop, 
Winthrop, 
Woburn, . 
Woburn, . 

Woburn, . 



Old Mystic valley sewer, near 
Abbajona River, 

Turned the old Mystic valley 
sewer into the metropolitan 
sewer, 



Easterly side of metropolitan 
sewer in Cross Street, 

275 feet south of Swanton Street, 
Station 5+11.20, Section 45, 

On westerly side of metropolitan 
sewer in Mystic valley park- 
way, at man-hole, 

Shirley Street, corner Washing- 
ton Avenue, . . . . 

Pleasant Street, near Belle Isle 
Inlet, 



Shirley Street, Short Beach, . 

At Magee's Corner, 

Corner Canal and Lake streets, . 

In private land, Baeder, Adamson 
&Co., glue works settling tanks, 

Old Mystic valley sewer, at Cross 
Street, 



10 inch, 

12 inch, 
15 inch, 

18 inch, 

12 inch, 

12 inch, 
10 inch, 
12 inch, 
15 inch, 

8 inch, 

15 inch, 



Aug. 8, 1895. 

July 18, 1895. 
Oct. 17, 1896. 
Dec. 21, 1895. 

Aug. 25, 1896. 

Jan. 17, 1895. 

Aug. 24, 1895. 
Oct. 29, 1895. 
Oct. 8, 1896. 
Oct. 9, 1895. 

Nov. 9, 1895. 

Sept. 2, 1895. 



The one hundred and one connections authorized on this 
system to this date (Oct. 1, 1897) are distributed as follows : 
Arlington, three ; Belmont, one ; Boston ( Charlestown dis- 
trict), six; Boston (East Boston district), thirteen; Boston 
(Deer Island), three ; Cambridge, eighteen ; Chelsea, five ; 
Everett, three ; Maiden, five ; Medford, seventeen ; Mel- 
rose, eight; Somerville, four; Winchester, eight; Win- 
throp, four ; and Woburn, three. Included within these 
one hundred and one connections, four remain to be made, 
one in Charlestown, two at Deer Island and one in Medford ; 
while nine are connected, though not in operation, eight of 
these being in East Boston and one in Charlestown, thus 
leaving eighty-eight connections in actual operation at this 
time (Oct. 1, 1897). 

Expenditures. 

The expenditures upon this system, including all pay- 
ments on account of contracts during the twelve months end- 
ing Sept. 30, 1897, amount to $44,260.79. This, with the 
amount previously reported, $4,956,554.50, makes the total 



1808.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xix 

expenditures on this system proper $5,000,815.29 to date. 
There has also been expended during the year upon the 
Wakefield branch $24,961.59, which, in addition to the 
amount previously reported, $125.98, makes $25,087.57; 
upon the Stoneham branch, ^2,S0'2.6S; making a grand 
total on this sys^tem and its branches to date, $5,028,705.54. 
Table D in the Appendix contains a full statement of the 
cost of operation for the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. Your 
attention is called to the tables submitted herewith for mat- 
ters of detail. 



CHARLES RIVER VALLEY SYSTEM. 

This system has been in constant operation during the 
year, and a full statement of the expense thereof is in Table 
E of the Appendix. The negotiations which were pending 
between the city of Boston and the State providing for receiv- 
ing into the main trunk sewer of said city at Huntington 
Avenue, corner of Gainsborough Street, Boston, the sewage 
from this system, and discharging the same at its outlet at 
Moon Island, for the period of five years, 1896 to 1900 inclu- 
sive, have been continued but without definite result at this 
date (Oct. 1, 1897). There seems, however, a possibility of a 
conclusion being reached and proper agreements being entered 
into between this Board and said city before the close of this 
year, as under the provisions of chapter 502, Acts of 1897, 
apjn'oved June 10, 1897, the city of Boston has asked for 
further negotiations regarding the same. Said agreement 
will also include the reception and disposal of the sewage 
from the Neponset valley system, covering the same period. 
Pending such contract, under verbal arrangement, the State 
has paid said city at the rate of $27,000 per annum in quar- 
terly instalments for the years 1896 and 1897, for such recep- 
tion and disposal of the sewage from this system. A bill 
prepared for the committee on metropolitan afiairs of the 
Legislature of 1896, and by said Legislature referred to its 
successor, authorizing the Commonwealth to acquire the Bos- 
ton main drainage system, by purchase or otherwise, and mak- 
ing appropriation therefor, we would respectfully call to your 
attention, and again urge its passage. 



XX METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

But one settlement for land taken upon this system has 
been made during the year. On the 16th of June, 1897, 
Charles A. Read, an owner of land in Newton, quit-claimed 
to the Commonwealth, by deed of even date, *' rights, 
privileges and easements " included within a taking made by 
this Board dated March 7, 1891, and recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, book 2030, page 121. The deed of 
Read is recorded in said Registry, book 2583, page 76. 

This leaves the following cases on this system still pend- 
ing in court at this date (Oct. 1, 1897) : Suffolk County, 
Butchers* Slaughtering and Melting Association, motion for 
a new trial still pending ; Middlesex County, Albert Brackett, 
Newton. 

Watertown Siphon. 

In our last report (Public Document No. 45, 1897) we 
say: **The engineer was authorized to proceed with the 
work of constructing the siphon at East Watertown upon 
receipt of licenses from the authorities in Washington, D. C, 
and the Harbor and Land Commissioners of the Common- 
wealth, which have not been received at this date (Oct. 1, 
1896)." 

The license from the authorities in Washington, D. C, was 
received on the 17th of October, 1896, that from the Harbor 
and Land Commissioners of the Commonwealth having pre- 
viously reached this Board ; and on Oct. 28, 1896, a contract 
was executed with Perkins & White of Boston for the con- 
struction of said siphon, at an expense of $8,000, all expense 
attending said construction to be paid by the town of Water- 
town. 

An easement in certain parcels of land in Brighton and 
Watertown necessary for the construction of said siphon was 
taken by this Board by two deeds dated Oct. 17, 1896, and 
recorded, that for Brighton in Suffolk Registry of Deeds, 
book 2394, page 530 ; that for Watertown with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, book 2506, page 148. On May 22, 
1897, the chief engineer presented to the Board the certificate 
of completion of the Watertown siphon by Perkins & White, 
contractors, and the same was accepted by vote of the Board. 

On June 26, 1897, in answer to a petition, the Board 
approved a connection for said town by means of an 18-inch 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



XXI 



branch with this siphon. This is the only connection made 
with the metropolitan sewer in the Charles River valley during 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897, and makes a total of thirty- 
nine connections authorized on this system to date. We 
print a complete list thereof according to localities : — 



Date 
autuokized. 



City or Town. 



Location of Connection. 



Size. 



Date of 
Corapletion. 



May 


3, 


1892, 


May 


6, 


1892, 


Bept. 


27. 


1892, 


Oct. 


28, 


1892, 


Jan. 


27, 


1893, 


May 


2, 


1893, 


July 


1. 


1893, 


July 


12, 


1893, 


Aug. 


19, 


1893. 


Aug. 


19, 


1S93, 


Sept. 


9, 


1893, 


May 


12, 


1894, 


Not. 


17, 


1894, 


May 


24, 


1892, 


May 


30, 


1892, 


May 


19, 


1894, 


Oct. 


13, 


1892, 


Feb. 


8. 


1893, 


May 


12, 


1893, 


May 


19, 


1894, 


July 


20, 


1895, 


July 


20, 


189.S 


April 


29, 


1892, 


May 


3. 


1892, 



Boston,* 

Boston,* 
Boston,* 

Boston,* 

Boston,* 
Boston,* 
Boston,* 
Boston,* 

Boston,* 
Boston,* 
Boston,* 
Boston,* 

Boston,* 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Boston, 
Boston, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Brookline, 
Newton, . 



Cambridge Street, corner Seattle 
Street 

Kena Street, 

Western Avenue, foot of Market 
Street, 

Western Avenue, near Everett 
Street, 

Near Salt Creek, . . . . 

Near Parsons' Brook, . 

Near Faneuil station, . . 

Rena Street, corner Bertram 
Street 

A bbatoir. Station 24-f 08, 

Abbatoir, Station 34+63, 

Abbatoir (tripe works), 

Parpons Street, opposite Taylor's 
Mill, 

Corner North Harvard and Spurr 
streets, 

Brookline Avenue, corner Belle- 
vue Street, 

133 feet north of Brookline Ave- 
nue, Back Bay Fens, . 

Huntington Avenue, near Parker 
Street, 

Commonwealth Avenue and St. 
Mary Street, .... 

Vila Street 

Park Commissioners, Adminis- 
tration Building, 

Huntington Avenue and Parker 
Street 

Corner Huntington Avenue and 
Bryant Street, on south side of 
metropolitan sewer, . 

Corner Huntington Avenue and 
Bryant Street, on north side of 
metropolitan sewer, . . . 

Commonwealth Avenue, corner 
St. Mary Street 

At Lemon or Hyde Brook, . 
* Brighton. 



15 inch, 
12 inch, 

18 inch, 

24 inch, 
24 Inch, 
24 inch, 
15 Inch, 

15 inch, 
15 inch, 
15 inch, 
15 inch, 

24 inch, 

15 inch, 

12 inch, 

6 inch, 

12 inch, 

18 inch, 
24 inch, 

6 inch, 

12 inch, 

24 inch, 

12 inch, 

24 inch, 
24 inch. 



May 3, 1892. 
May 6, 1892. 

Sept. 27, 1892. 

Oct." 28, 1892. 
Jan. 27, 1893. 
May 2, 1893. 
July 1, 1893. 

Aug. 25, 1893. 
Sept. 26, 1893. 
Oct. 6, 1893. 
Oct. 26, 1893. 

July 31, 1894. 

Nov. 20, 1894. 

May 24, 1892. 

May 12, 1893. 

May 30, 1894. 

Oct. 13, 1892. 
Feb. 3,1893. 

May 12, 1893. 

May 30. 1894. 

Sept. 19, 1895. 

Sept. 26, 1895. 

Apr. 29, 1892. 
May 3, 1892. 



xxu 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Date 
aijthobized. 



City or Town. 



Location of Connection. 



Size. 



Date of 
Completion. 



May 4, 1892, 

May 28, 1892, 

Oct. 8, 1892, 

May 11, 1893, 

Sept. 1,1893, 

Oct. 26, 1895, 

May 2, 1896, 

June 24, 1892, 

June 9, 1892, 

July 9, 1892, 

July 9, 1892, 

July 9, 1892. 

May 26, 1893, 

July 1, 1893, 

June 26, 1897, 



Newton, . 

Newton, . 
Newton, . 
Newton, . 
Newton, . 
Newton, . 

Newton, . 

Waltham, 

Watertown, 

Watertown, 

Watertown, 

Watertown, 

Watertown, 
Watertown, 
Watertown, 



California Street, corner Crescent 
Street 



Nonantum Street, . 

Near Cheesecake Brook, 

California and Said streets, . 

California and Dalby streets. 

In garden of Sarah L. M. Bates 
near Hyde Brook, 

In land of estate of Matilda Emer 
son, east of Hyde Brook, . 

Corner North and Calvary streets 
at the end of the metropolitan 
sewer, 



California Street, corner G-alen 
Street, 



Watertown Street, corner Cali 
fornia Street, 

Water Street, on the east side of 
the metropolitan sewer, . 

Water Street, on the west side of 
the metropolitan sewer. 

Barker's Starch Factory, 

Hickory Wheel Company, . 

At siphon at U. S. Arsenal, . 



24 inch, 
10 inch, 
24x36in 
10 inch, 
10 inch, 

5 inch, 

5 inch. 



24 inch, 

10 inch, 

8 inch, 

8 inch, 

6 inch, 

5 inch, 

18 inch, 



May 4, 1892. 
May 28, 1892. 
Oct. 8, 1892. 
May 11, 1893. 
Sept. 1, 1893. 

Nov. 4, 1895. 

May 18, 1896. 

June 24, 1892. 

June 9, 1892. 

July 9,1892. 

July 9, 1892. 

July 9, 1892. 

May 26, 1893. 

Never 

connected. 
July 21, 1897. 



These thirty-nine connections authorized to this date (Oct. 
1, 1897) are distributed as follows: Boston (Brighton dis- 
trict), thirteen; Boston, nine; Brookline, one; Newton, 
eight; Waltham, one; and Watertown, seven. One of 
these (the Hickory Wheel Company, Watertown) has never 
been made, and is not likely to be, the said company having 
moved from Watertown outside the metropolitan district. 



Expenditures. 

The expenditures upon this system, including all payments 
on account of contracts during the twelve months ending 
Sept. 30, 1897, but not including expenses of operations 
(which are particularly stated in Table E of the Appendix), 
amount to $325.21. This, with the amount previously 
reported, $788,797.31, makes $789,122.52 as the total expen- 
ditures to date. 



1808.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 45. xxiii 

Your attention is called to tables submitted herewith for 
matters of detail, and es[)ecially to Table E, *' for maintaining 
and operating the Charles River valley system." The third 
item in said table, dated '* Feb. 11, 1897, to appropriation 
made by chapter 61, Acts of 1897, $1,857.07," is explained 
by the following correspondence : — 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Metkopolitan Sewerage Commissiovers, 1 Mr. Vernon St., 
Boston, Jan. 9, 1897. 

Hon. John W. Kimball, Auditor, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

State House, Boston, Mass. 

Dkau Sir: — I send herewith bill and vouchers, aniounting to 
$384. G7, for money paid on account of maintaining and operating 
the Charles River valley system of sewerage, and when this shall 
have been allowed and paid there will remain unexpended $4,892.93 
of the amount heretofore appropriated for this purpose. There 
remains unpaid at this date (Jan. 9, 1897), a bill of the city of 
lioston (enclosed herewith) amounting to $G,750, for disposing of 
the sewage from said valley for the quarter ending Jan. 1, 1897, 
which is more by $1,857.07 than the amount on hand to pay the 
same. The reason for this deficiency is principally our failure to 
make as favorable terms with the city for the year 1896 as we had 
in previous years. No contract was made until April, 1896, and 
then only a verbal one, covering that year, for $27,000, particulars 
of which are fully given in the eighth annual report, pages xxvi 
to xlii, inclusive (Public Document No. 45, 1897). This was 
$3,000 in excess of the highest amount previously paid, and greater 
than the amount used in making the estimate reported to the Leg- 
islature of 1896. 

Will you kindly present this matter to the General Court at its 
present session, in accordance with the provisions of section 37, 
chapter 16 of the Public Statutes, that the deficiency may be pro- 
vided for? 

By order of the Board, (Signed) Edward P. Fisk, 

Clerk. 

The Auditor, as requested, included in a deficiency bill 
(chapter 61, Acts of 1897) $1,857 07. 

This Board had intended to include in this report two 
maps, both similar to that published in our last annual report 
(Public Document No. 45, 1897), one showing more clearly 
by different colors the areas in the three systems contribut- 



xxiv METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

ing a compound system, i,e., where storm water and house 
sewage contribute to the sewer, and also where storm water 
is eliminated from the system ; and the other showing the 
proposed high-level sewer recommended by the chief en- 
gineer in his communication to the Board, dated Aug. 24, 
1897, discharging at Peddock's Ishmd. In accordance with 
the provisions of chapter 258 of the Acts of 1896 the follow- 
ing correspondence, which explains itself, was had : — 

Metropolitan Sewerage Commission, 1 Mt. Vernon St., 
Boston, Oct. 29, 1897- 

Hon. William M. Olin, Secretary of State, State House, Boston. 

Dear Sir: — In preparing the ninth annual report of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, it is desired to introduce two 
maps of the metropolitan sewerage district. The first of these 
maps shows in a general way the routes of the sewers, sizes and 
elevations, and the territory provided for and now connected with 
the system. The stones for this general map were prepared and 
paid for last year. The map as at present prepared involves the 
printing of two more colors tLian appeared last year. The price 
of last year's printing, not including stone, was $185. The 
lithographers, Messrs. Geo. H. Walker & Co., who now hold 
the stone, are asking for this year's print of the map $185, as 
last year, plus $50 for the additional colors, making a total cost 
of $235 for an issue of 3,000 copies. 

The second map which it is desired to introduce shows the 
general district, and a study of a contemplated future high-level 
sewer, about which certain recommendations are to be made by 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners. This map will involve 
a reproduction of the original map and a printing of seven colors, 
three more than on the original map. For this map the lithog- 
raphers ask $185, same as original, plus $75 for three extra colors, 
making a total cost of $260 for 3,000 copies. 

If an order is given for both maps, the lithographer will furnish 
both for $465, as parts of the printing on both stones can be made 
with one set of the printing press. 

In addition to the maps above outlined, it is desired to produce 
two zinc plates, showing anticipated quantities of sewage, for the 
purpose of contrasting them with actual quantities received at the 
pumping stations. Wright & Potter, printers, will furnish these 
zinc plates for $7, and they can be printed with the regular text. 

In accordance with chapter 258 of the Acts of 1896 we now 
make application to you to authorize this work, in order that we 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xxv 

may begin on the maps to finish them at such a time as will avoid 

delay in the publication of our report. 

A copy of this request has been forwarded to General Kimball, 

the Auditor. 

For the Board, yours very truly, 

(Sigued) Herbert E. Brayton, 

Acting Clerk, 

A similar communication of even date was addressed to 
the Auditor of the Commonwealth, and the following reply 
was received : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Office of the Secretary, Boston, Nov. 3, 1897. 

Herbert E. Brayton, Actinrj Clerk, Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 
sioners, 1 Ml. Vernon Street, Boston. 

Dear Sir : — Referring to yours of October 29, relative to pro- 
posed illustration of the ninth annual report of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commissioners, at an aggregate cost of $472, the Sec- 
retary of the Commonwealth and the Auditor of Accounts desire 
to be intovmed as to what will be shown by the addition of the 
two colors to the map of last year more than was shown on 
that map ; also, whether the lithographic stone is the property of 
Messrs. George H. Walker & Co , or of the Commonwealth. 

An early reply is requested. 

Very respectfully, (Signed) Wm. M. Olin, 

Secretary. 

The clerk and chief engineer of the Board waited upon the 
Secretary and Auditor and furnished them the information 
desired, alter which the following was received in reply : — 

Cojimonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Office of the Secretary, Boston, Nov. 16, 1897. 

Edward P. Fisk, Esq., Clerk, Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, 
1 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston. 

My Dear Sir: — Referring to the request of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commissioners for authority to illustrate the forthcoming 
annual report of the commissioners by certain maps and plates at 
a total expense of $472, I beg to say that, as the appropriation 
from which the cost of these illustrations must be paid is exhausted, 
the Secretary of the Commonwealth and the Auditor of Accounts 
find themselves, much to their regret, unable to grant the desired 
authority. 

Very respectfully, (Signed) Wm. M. Olin, 

Secretary. 



xxvi METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

We publish herewith the full report of the chief engineer 
on the high-level sewer alluded to, as it affects both the 
Charles River and Neponset valley systems : — 

Boston, Mass., Aug. 24, 1897. 

HosEA. Kingman, Tilly Haynes, George A. Kimball, Board of 

Metropolitan Seiverage Commissioners. 

Gentlemen: — Iq compliance with your request, preliminary 
studies have been prepared of probable cost of sewage disposal 
for the Charles and Neponset River areas of the metropolitan 
sewerage system by other means than through the main sewers 
and pumping station of the main drainage works of the city of 
Boston. The results of these studies are herewith submitted. 

The total area at present tributary to the main drainage works 
is approximately 121 square miles, divided as follows : — 

City of Boston (square miles), 23 

City of Quincy (square miles), 12 

Charles and Neponset areas of metropolitan sewerage 

(square miles), .86 

This is approximately 100 per cent, in excess of the area for 
which the works were originally designed. The excess is made 
up by the addition of the following cities and towns to the area 
as originally outlined : Waltham, Watertown, Dedham (nearly the 
whole of the town, including the main village) , Hyde Park, Mil- 
ton and Quincy. 

The very large added areas and the increase of population, much 
in advance of the original estimates, have so materially reduced 
the life of the works that the ultimate capacity will probably be 
attained about A.D. 1910, or from ten to fifteen years earlier than 
anticipated in the original studies. This fact is further outlined 
in the seventh annual report of your Board, pages 44 and 45. 

Of the area now tributary to main drainage, 61 square miles, or 
about 50 per cent, of the tributary area, is at sufficient elevation 
and suitably located to collect its sewage in a gravity sewer, out- 
letting at Moon Island or elsewhere on the coast. Such a high- 
level intercepter was contemplated in the original design of main 
drainage, and a branch 9 feet in diameter was built into the main 
sewer at Squantum in anticipation of it. 

The necessities of the Neponset valley will probably require the 
construction of a high-level relief sewer to Hyde Park as early 
as A.D. 1905, as outlined in the seventh annual report of your 
Board, pages 42 to 46 inclusive. As the Moon Island outlet could 
provide for it for only five or ten years, it would appear desirable 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xxvii 

to construct a new outlet at Nut Island, Peddock's Island or else- 
where. The probable route of such a high-level sewer when built 
above H^^de Park could pass within a short distance of the lower 
end of the Charles River main. A practical and comparatively 
inexpensive scheme would be to sufficiently enlarge this high-level 
sewer when built, and receive sewage from the Charles River area 
lifted to it about 45 feet by pumps located near the lower end 
of the Charles River system. 

On the accompanying map* are outlined, in brown, areas natur- 
ally tributary to such a high-level sewer ; areas in the Charles 
River valley and lower Neponset and Quincy requiring to be 
pumped arc outlined in blue. 

Quincy is already preparing to pump all its sewage about 30 
feet to Squantum ; to the high-level sewer, as shown, drainage 
from only the lower areas will need to be lifted about 20 feet, 
while the higher parts of the city can drain into it by gravity. 

Preliminary estimates of cost from the best available data have 
been prepared for a high-level sewer over the routes indicated on 
the map to Moon Island, Nut Island and Peddock's Island, with and 
without enlargement sufficient to receive Charles River sewage. 
No surveys or geological studies of the ground have been made. 

Table of Gross Cost for High-level Sewer, as shown on Accompany- 
ing Maps, from Corner of Boylston and Cypress Streets in 
Brookline to Outlet at Coast, including Pumping Stations and 
Force Mains in Charles and Neponset River Areas, not includ- 
ing Cost of Pumping Station and Force Main in Quincy. 

To Moon Island: — 

High-level sewer without Ch:\rle9 River sewage, . . . $3,922,296 
lligli-level sewer with Charles River sewage, . . . 4,714,925 

To Nut Island : — 

Tlii^h-level sewer without Charles River sewage, . . . $3,331,856 
High-level sewer with Charles River sewage, . . . 4,202,956 

7'o Peddock's Island : — 
High-level sewer without Charles River sewage, . . . $3,745,516 
High-level sewer with Charles River sewage, . . . 4,618,713 

From the foregoing table it appears that about $900,000 for 
either of the three routes would be the total cost of enlarging a 
high-level trunk sewer sufficiently to receive Charles and Neponset 
area sewage needing to be pumped, and providing pumping stations 
and force mains from present metropolitan areas outlined in blue. 

* See correspondence, pp. xxiv, xxv. 



xxviii METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

The studies thus far made indicate that by A.D. 1905 a high- 
level sewer will probably have been constructed. At that date 
the sewage from about one-fifth of the Neponset and nine-tenths 
of the Charles River area will require to be pumped. 

The expense of disposal for these areas through the high-level 
system for the decennial period A.D. 1905 to 1915 will be approx- 
imately as follows : — 

Interest and sinking fund charges, 3^ per cent, on $900,000, . $31,500 
For maintenance of Charles River pumping station : — 

Labor, $6,000 

Coal and supplies, 6,000 

12,000 

For maintenance of Granite bridge station : — 

Labor, $3,000 

Coal and supplies, 2,000 

5,000 

Total yearly charges, $48,500 

For disposal through main drainage system by rental for these 
areas, as outlined in letter of B. W. Wells of Jan. 23, 1896, for 
A.D. 1905 to A.D. 1910, is — 

1905, $65,300 

1910, 74,600 

averaging for the period $69,900. 

The conclusions from the study are as follows : the capacity of 
Boston's present outlet at Moon Island is so rapidly being taken 
up by the sewage from the very largely extended areas now tribu- 
tary to it, that when the high-level gravity sewer is built it will 
probably be found wisest to seek a new outlet for it at the coast ; 
that the necessities of the Neponset valley will require this high- 
level sewer about A.D. 1905; that when built it can be slightly 
enlarged to receive through pumps the Charles River sewage at 
reasonable and practicable costs, and with economy, above rental 
at present demanded by the city of Boston. 

To determine the most desirable location for a new outlet at the 
coast for a high-level system would require careful hydrographic 
surveys extended over a year or more. Much of the sewerage of 
Milton is possibly dependent on the route of a future high-level 
sewer through that town. In Hyde Park and the southerly section 
of Stony Brook area of the city of Boston definite knowledge is 
already needed of the future high-level route, to enable engineers 
to prepare studies of sewage relief for these areas. The State 
Board of Health has practically prohibited overflows from your 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xxix 

Neponset valley system, which will necessitate an additional relief 
outlet at an early date. 

It would seem desirable to arrange, if possible, for a compre- 
hensive study of the future high-level problem. It might offer a 
solution of the question of future rentals to the city of Boston. 
Profiles and detailed estimates of routes indicated accompany the 
general map. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) Wm. M. Brown, Jr., 

Chief Engineer. 

We would respectfully recommend that an amount, which 
can be reported later, be made to make the necessary sound- 
ings, float experiments and borings to determine the best 
course for the high-level sewer, and ask that said appropria- 
tion be made as early as possible, so that the work may be 
carried out without unnecessary delay. 



NEPONSET VALLEY SYSTEM. 

The following settlements for land taken upon this system 
have been made during the year : — 

On Nov. 24, 1896, Thomas F. Reddy released to the 
Commonwealth '' rights, privileges and easements" in land 
in Hyde Park, included within a taking dated April 25, 
1896, and recorded with Norfolk Deeds, book 759, page 
601. The deed of Roddy's is recorded with Norfolk Deeds, 
book 776, page 637. 

On Feb. 12, 1897, the Tileston &> Hollingsworth Company 
of Boston, by deed recorded with Sufiblk Registry, book 
2423, page 439, quit-claims to the Commonwealth ** rights, 
privileges and easements " in certain parcels of land in Boston 
(Dorchester), included within a taking dated March 28, 
1896, and recorded with Suffolk Deeds, book 2347, page 
585; and on Jan. 14, 1897, John W. Smith of Hyde Park 
conveyed to the Commonwealth in fee a parcel of land in 
said Hyde Park, for use as a stock yard and locker. Said 
deed of Smith's is recorded with Norfolk Registry, book 776, 
page 636. 



XXX METROPOLITAN SEWP:RAGE. [Jan. 

On Feb. 10, 1897, Martha A. Marshall, John O. Ray and 
Sarah M Ray, his wife, by deed recorded with Norfolk Regis- 
try, book 787, page 512, quit-claimed to the Commonwealth 
*' rights, privileges and easements " in land in Hyde Park in- 
cluded wdthin a taking dated June 13, 1896, and recorded 
with Norfolk Registry, book 764, page 5; Ernest Halbauer 
of Dedham, with Sarah Halbauer, his wife, and the Dedham 
Institution for Savings, holder of a certain mortgage on said 
premises, release to the Commonwealth *' rights, privileges 
and easements" included within the former takino: and re- 
corded as aforesaid. This deed of Halbauer's is recorded 
with Norfolk Registry, book 787, page 510. 

Lucy B. Fitton of Hyde Park, by deed dated March 13, 
1897, together with the Hyde Park Savings Bank, the holder 
of a certain mortgage on said premises, quit-claims to the 
Commonwealth "rights, privileges and easements" in land 
in Hyde Park, included within a taking dated April 25, 
1896, and recorded with Norfolk Registry, book 759, page 
601. The deed of Fitton's is recorded with Norfolk Reo^is- 
try, book 787, page 509. 

By deed dated April 16, 1897, recorded with Suffolk Reg- 
istry, book 2448, page 4, Edward Cushing and Mary Cushing, 
his wife, release to the Commonwealth '* rights, privileges 
and easements" in land in Boston (Dorchester), included 
within a taking dated March 28, 1896, and recorded with 
Suffolk Registry, book 2347, page 385. 

Abba M. Martine, in her own right, and Charles F., her 
husband, with Albert K. Teele and Richard C. Humphreys, 
executors and trustees under the will of Edmund J. Baker, 
the assignee of a mortgage given by said Martines, release 
to the Commonwealth '' rights, privileges and easements" in 
a certain parcel of land in Boston (Dorchester), included 
within the aforesaid taking. The said deed from Martine 
is recorded with Suffolk Registry, book 2448, page 1. 

Two other deeds for damage to land included within the 
aforesaid taking have been executed. John B. Tileston, 
Roger E. and Wilder Tileston, together with John B. 
Tileston and Arthur Foote, trustees under the will of Caleb 
Foote,the assignees of a certain mortgage given by Franklin 
L. Tileston, by deed dated April 17, 1897, quit-claim to the 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xxxi 

Commonwealth ''rights, privileges and easements" in land 
in Boston (Dorchester) ; and John Conness, with Mary R,, 
his wife, together with the Franklin Savings Bank of Boston, 
holder of a certain mortgage given by said Conness, quit- 
claim to the Commonwealth by deed dated July 19, 1897, 
** rights, privileges and easements" in land in Boston (Dor- 
chester), included within the aforesaid taking. The deed 
from the Tilestons is recorded in Suffolk Registry, book 
2448, page 3 ; and that from John Conness in Suffolk 
Registry, book 2464, page 94. 

Eva J. Dol liver of Kingston, N. H., by deed dated Sept. 
3, 1897, quit-claims to the Commonwealth " rights, priv- 
ileges and easements" in land in Hyde Park, included within 
a taking made April 25, 1896, and recorded with Norfolk 
Registry, book 759, page 601. Her deed is recorded in Nor- 
folk Registry, book 798, page 13. 

** Rights, privileges and easements " in land included within 
a taking made by this Board June 13, 1896, and recorded in 
Norfolk Hegislry, book 764, page 5, were released to the 
Commonwealth in land in Dedham by Thomas F. Temperly 
of said Dedham and Catherine Temperly, his wife, in her 
own right, by deed dated July 21, 1897, and recorded in 
Norfolk Registry, book 794, page 221. Another deed, 
dated July 21, 1897, from William J. Mulkern of Dedham 
and Nellie V., his wife, in her own right, releases to the 
Commonwealth land in Dedham in the aforesaid taking, 
which deed is recorded in Norfolk Registry, book 794, page 
226, and is joined in by Jonathan M. Smith, assignee of a 
mortgage given to Benj. Smith by Artemas S. Raymond, 
and dated June 17, 1874. 

Similar '* rights, privileges and easements," included within 
a taking dated July 1, 1896, and recorded in Norfolk Regis- 
try, book 764, page 501, have been released to the Common- 
wealth by deeds as follows : dated June 18, 1897, Elijah W. 
Bonnemort and Cora E., his wife, by deed recorded in Nor- 
folk Registry, book 794, page 222 ; Peter Gallagher of Ded- 
ham, with Mary, his wife, by deed dated July 29, 1897, and 
recorded in Norfolk Registry, book 794, page 223 ; Chauncey 
S. Churchill, John Monahan, with Elizabeth, his wife, by 
deed recorded with Norfolk Registry, book 794, page 259 ; 



xxxii METKOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

Isabel Chisholm, by deed dated Aug. 7, 1897, recorded in 
Norfolk Registry, book 794, page 224 ; Bernard McCaffrey, 
by deed dated Aug. 9, 1897, recorded with Norfolk Regis- 
try, book 794, page 225 ; Ruth Proctor, by deed dated Sept. 
27, 1897, recorded with Norfolk Registry, book 798, page 
14. The rights in land conveyed by the last six deeds all 
lie in the town of Dedham. 

On Jan. 23, 1897, the Engineer was authorized to expend 
$150 for a locker and fence surrounding the yard on the lot 
purchased in Hyde Park of John W. Smith, and the same 
has since been done. 

On May 1, 1897, the Board voted to advertise for bids on 
the remaining sections (26 to 29) on the Neponset valley 
system, to be opened at noon of May 22, 1897. On that 
date, from the eleven bids on Section 26 and nine on Section 

27, the Board accepted the bid of the National Contracting 
Company of New York, the lowest bidders on each section, 
fixing the bonds on the same at $5,000 on Section 26 and 
$3,600 on Section 27. These bonds were furnished by 
the National Contracting Company of New York, with the 
American Surety Company of New York as surety, and 
duly accepted by the Board, contracts being executed with 
them for the construction of Sections 2Q and 27. 

Sections 28 and 29 were taken under advisement by the 
Board, and at the meeting of May 29, 1897, the Board 
allowed T. F. Lynch & Co. to withdraw their bid on Section 

28. Burton R. Felton of Somerville, Frederick Holbrook 
of Quincy, William B. Cabot of Brookline and John W. 
Daly of Boston, under the firm name of Felton & Holbrook, 
Cabot & Daly, offered to take this section at the figures 
submitted by T. F. Lynch & Co. The Board placed the 
bond for the same at $4,000, but postponed action in award- 
ing the contract for one week, to await result in regard to 
taking on said section. On the same date the Board accepted 
the bid of Dennis F. O'Connell of Dorchester for the con- 
struction of Section 29, fixing the bond on the same at 
$2,700. At the meeting of June 5, 1897, the bonds on 
these sections were furnished by the contractors, that on 
Section 28 with the American Surety Company of New 
York as surety, and that on Section 29 with Thomas W. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xxxiii 

Carter and Mary F. O'Connell, both of Boston, as sureties; 
and said contracts were executed by the Board. These sec- 
tions complete the full line of the Neponset valley system. 

A full list of the bids received on these four sections will 
be found in Table B of the Appendix. 

Land Takings. 

The land takings of the Board during the past year upon 
this system have been as follows, and are mainly on the four 
sections for which contracts have been made : on May 29, 
1897, the Board executed a deed taking the right to con- 
struct, operate and maintain an underground main sewer, 
beginning at the point forming the terminus of the taking 
dated July 1, 1896, and recorded with Norfolk Deeds, book 
7()4, page 501, and extending from that point to the boun- 
dary line between West Roxbury and Dedham. This deed 
is recorded with Norfolk Registry, book 787, page 502. 

The taking in West Roxbury is made by three deeds, 
executed June 5, 1897, plans marked Numbers 1, 2 and 3, 
respectively, and recorded with Norfolk Registry, book 
2448, pages 6 to 14, inclusive. 

Location of Seaver Line. 

The centre line of sewer on these sections may be described 
as follows : beginning at the point reached by the taking of 
July 1, 1896, between land of Elijah Bonnemort and Mary 
E. Nay, about 350 feet beyond the point where the sewer 
crosses the Dedham branch of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad, the centre line continues through private 
lands to the boundary line between Dedham and West Rox- 
bury, and thence crossing the said boundary line it continues 
in private lands to Gardner Street ; thence it follows said 
street to private lands near the corner of Adams Street, and 
passes through other private lands from this point, crossing 
Farragut Street and private lands to Baker Street ; crossing 
said street, it continues through private lands to LaGrange 
Street, and thence by LaGrange, Weld and Newfield streets 
to private lands, crossing Caspar Street, and other private 
lands belonging to Mary C. Blakemore. Here it crosses 



xxxiv METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

AVorley Street and private lands to Weld Street, continuing 
on said street to a point about 300 feet from where a brook 
crosses said street in the neighborhood of Gould Avenue. 

The total length of this line is 16,806 feet, of which 14,219 
feet lie in private land and -2,587 feet in public highways. 
This, added to the amount reported in our last annual report 
(Public Document No. 45, 1897, page lix), makes 52,462 
feet as the length of the sewer in the Neponset valley, of 
which 34,460 feet is in private land and 18,002 feet in public 
highways. 

At the meeting of Jan. 2, 1897, Ellerton P. Whitney, 
chairman, and other members of the Board of Sewer Com- 
missioners of Milton, met this Board by appointment, and 
asked that outlets for said town be provided at the following 
points : on the Milton side of the river in said town, at 
Granite bridge, Milton Lower Mills, Central Avenue and 
Mattapan. They were advised to secure legislation author- 
izing the same, which they did by chapter 80, Acts of 1897, 
approved February 18 of that year; and in accordance with 
this act the Board, at its meeting of June 5, directed the 
Engineer to proceed with the construction of the Milton 
connections by day labor, having voted at its meeting of 
May 29, 1897, to execute takings of land for these connec- 
tions, with the exception of Granite bridge. The deeds 
of these takings are recorded with Norfolk Registry, book 
787, pages 504 to 507 inclusive, and in Suffolk Registry, 
book 2446, pages 449 to 453 inclusive. The plans of the 
connections received the approval of the Harbor and Land 
Commissioners, and were submitted to the State Board of 
Health in accordance with the provisions of the act ; the fol- 
lowing reply being received from the latter Board : — 

Office of State Board of Health, 

State House, Boston, May 28, 1897. 

To the Metroiioliian Sewerage Commission^ Boston, Mass. 

Gentlemen: — The State Board of Health received from you, 
on April 24, 1897, an application requesting the approval of plans 
for extensions of the Neponset valley sewer to the town of Milton, 
the approval of the Board being required by the provisions of sec- 
tion 1, chapter 406, Acts of 1895, as amended by chapter 80 of 
the Acts of 1897. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xxxv 

The plans submitted by you show extensions from the Neponset 
valley sewer at three places: 1. Adams Street, Milton Lower 
Mills; 2. Central Avenue ; 3. Near Blue Hill Avenue, Mattapan. 

The first plan shows a sewer about 220 feet in length, extending 
from the Neponset valley intercepting sewer in Baker's Court, 
Dorchester, through Adams Street, to and across the Neponset 
River to a point in Milton about 13 feet south of the face of the 
southerly abutment of the Neponset River bridge, and just beyond 
a man-hole to be located close to the southerly end of the bridge. 
This sewer is designed to iuterce[)t sewage from an existing sewer 
in Milton Lower Mills, which now discharges into the Neponset 
River below the last dam. By the plan submitted, the proposed 
extension in crossing the Neponset River will be attached to or 
suspended from the existing bridge. 

The plan also shows the method suggested for the connection 
of the INIilton sewer with the metropolitan sewer, involving an 
inverted siphon, consisting of two 6-inch iron pipes, to convey the 
sewage beneath the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 
In order to secure a greater certainty of the successful operation 
of the siphon, it is desirable that the pipes be larger, or that ordi- 
nary sewer pipes be used instead of iron. 

The second plan shows a sewer about 250 feet in length, ex- 
tending from the Neponset valley intercepting sewer in Central 
Avenue, Dorchester, to and across the Neponset River to a pro- 
posed man-hole on the Milton side of the river, about 10 feet from 
the southerly end of the Central Avenue bridge. It is proposed 
to support the sewer upon a portion of the bridge structure where 
it crosses the river. 

The third plan shows a sewer about 195 feet in length, extending 
from the Neponset valley intercepting sewer at Mattapan Square 
to and beneath the Neponset River to a point in Milton about 30 
feet south of the southerly bank of the river. The place of cross- 
ing the river, as indicated by the plan, is about 18 feet east of the 
present Blue Hill Avenue bridge. 

The proposed extensions of the Neponset valley sewer in Cen- 
tral Avenue and Blue Hill Avenue are designed to receive sewage 
from districts in Milton indicated upon a plan submitted to this 
Board in 1894 by a sewerage committee of the town of Milton, 
and approved by the Board Sept. 25, 1894. The proposed exten- 
sion in Adams Street is designed to receive the dry-weather flow 
from an existing sewer in the village of Milton Lower Mills. This 
sewer, it is understood, receives at present both sewage and storm 
water, but the proposed extension of the Neponset valley sewer 
is designed to receive only the dry-weather flow from this sewer, 



xxxvi METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

allowing the surplus, at times of storms or melting snows, to be 
discharged into the Neponset River below the last dam, as at 
present. 

The Board has caused an examination of the location, sizes and 
grades of the proposed extensions to be made by its engineer, and 
concludes that they are adapted for the removal of the sewage 
which it is designed to convey to them ; and that, if constructed 
with care, and if the sewers crossing the river at Adams Street and 
Central Avenue are attached to and supported by the bridges in 
such a manner that they may not receive injury from freshets or 
otherwise, they can be made to operate satisfactorily. 

The Board hereby approves the proposed extensions of the 
Neponset valley sewer in Adams Street, Central Avenue and 
near Blue Hill Avenue, as described herein. 
By order of the Board, 

(Signed) Saml. W. Abbott, 

Secretary. 

At the meeting on Dec. 5, 1896, the Tileston & Hollings- 
worth Company, owners of the Mattapan Mills, Hyde Park, 
were given a hearing regarding damage to the chimney of 
said mills, which they claimed had been caused by blasting 
while constructing the sewer in that neighborhood. After 
hearing witnesses on both sides, the Board visited the 
localit}^ early the following week, and later, at the sugges- 
tion of said company, agreed to leave the matter to three 
disinterested parties, one to be selected by the said com- 
pany, one by this Board, and they jointly to select the third. 
Charles T. Main, of the firm of Dean & Main, 53 State 
Street, Boston, was selected by this Board as its representa- 
tive ; Charles H. Manning of Manchester, N. H., was selected 
by the Tileston & Hollingsworth Company, and Geo. E. 
Evans, of the firm of Geo. S. Rice & Geo. E. Evans of 
Boston, w^as selected as the third referee. After viewing 
the situation they submitted, on February 6, the following 
report : — 

Boston, Mass., Feb. 4, 1897. 
Metropolitan Sewerage Commission^ Boston, Mass. 

Gentlemen : — Our opinion of the cause of trouble with 
Tileston & Hollingsworth Company's chimney at Mattapan is, 
that primarily it was very faulty workmanship, the development 
of which may or may not have been accelerated by the blasting in 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



XXXVll 



line of metropolitan sewer. Whether or no these shocks were 
Buflicient to have wrecked the chimney if of good workmanship, 
there is no way of telling. We consider that the chimney should 
be repaired at the expense of its contractor. 

Respectfully submitted, (Signed) Chas. H. Manning. 

(Signed) Chas. T. Main. 

(Signed) Geo. E. Evans. 

A copy of this opinion was submitted to the Tileston &> 
Hollingsworth Company by said referees, and ended the 
matter so far as this Board was concerned. 



Connections with the Metropolitan Sewer on This 

System. 

The following connections have been authorized with the 
metropolitan sewer on this system at this date (Oct. 1, 
1897) : — 



Date 
authorized. 



City or Town. 



LocatioD of CoDDectioD. 



Size. 



Date of 
Completion. 



July 10,1897, BoBton,* . River Street, near Fremont Street,! 

July 3, 1897, Hyde Park, . Fairmount Avenue, between Nev? 

England Ruilroad and Neponset 
River, 

July 3,1897, Hyde Park, . Opposite exteneion of Milton 

Avenue, foot of Walter Street, 

July 3, 1897, Hyde Park, . Arlington Street, corner Metro- 
politan Avenue, .... 

July 3, 1897, Hyde Park, . Hyde Park Avenue, near Factory 

Street 

July 10, 1897, Hyde Park, . Hyde Park Avenue, near Factory 

Street, 

Aug. 11, 1897, Hyde Park, . Corner Business Street and Barry 

Place, 

Sept. 4, 1897, Milton, . . Blue Hills Parkway, . 



15 inch, 


12 inch, 


18 inch, 


15 inch, 


12 inch. 


20 inch. 


15 inch, 


12 inch, 



July 13, 1897. 

Aug. 6, 1897. 

To be made. 

Aug. 6, 1897. 

July 14, 1897. 

To be made. 

Sept. 7, 1897. 
To be made. 



* Dorchester. f Connected, but not in operation. 



The expenditures upon this system for the year have been 
$405,48H.31. This, with the amount previously reported, 
$203,254.30, makes $608,740.61 expended to date. Table 
F of the Appendix shows the amount expended for mainten- 
ance to Oct. 1, 1897. 



xxxviii METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 



On Monday, Oct. 12, 1896, Albert F. Noyes, a member 
of this Board, while hastening to take a train for Dedham in 
the Park Square Station of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad, died suddenly of heart disease. Out of 
respect to his memory, the office of the Board was closed 
on the day of the funeral, and the services, which occurred 
at the Episcopal Church, Auburndale, were attended by the 
other members of the Board, the clerk, chief engineer and 
numerous other employees, floral tributes being sent in 
behalf of the Board and the employees thereof. At the meet- 
ing of Saturday, Oct. 17, 1896, the Board unanimously 
adopted the following resolutions, presented by the chair- 
man : — 

Resolved^ That, by the death of Albert F. Noyes, this depart- 
ment of the Commonwealth has lost a conscientious, zealous and 
efficient public servant, and we a genial companion, faithful friend 
and most agreeable associate. 

Resolved^ That the foregoing be spread upon the records of the 
Board, and a copy thereof transmitted to his family. 

In accordance with the last resolution, the following com- 
munication, with a copy of the resolutions, was sent and 
duly acknowledged : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Boston, Oct. 23, 1896. 

At the meeting of this Board, held Oct. 17, 1896, the accom- 
panying resolutions, which are self-explanatory, were unanimously 
passed, and in accordance therewith I transmit the enclosed copy. 

For the Board, 
Very sincerely and respectfully yours, 

(Signed) Edward P. Fisk, 

Clerk. 
To the family of the late Albert F. Noyes. 



At the meeting on Saturday, Nov. 7, 1896, George A. 
Kimball of Somerville, who had been appointed by the acting 
governor and confirmed by the council as Mr. Noyes's suc- 
cessor, appeared, showing his commission as a member of 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. xxxix 

this Board, and assumed the duties of the oflSce, making the 
sixth commissioner who has qualified upon this Board since 
its organization. Tilly Haynes of Boston was appointed and 
commissioned as his own successor on this Board in January 
last. This is his third appointment, and upon the completion 
of this term he will have served eleven years thereon. 

At the annual meeting of the Board, held, as provided in 
the act (chapter 439, Acts of 1889), on the first Monday of 
February (February 1), 1897, Hosea Kingman of Bridge- 
water was a^ain chosen chairman and Edward P. Fisk clerk 
for the year. 

At its meeting on Aug. 25, 1897, the Board unanimously 
passed the following vote, which is self-explanatory : — 

Voted, That, because of the sickness and temporary absence of 
our clerk, Edward P. Eisk, Herbert E. Brayton is hereby selected 
and a[)poiated as actiog clerk during SHch absence. 

The recommendations made in this report, summarized 
briefly, are : that the State acquire or take the trunk line of 
the Boston main drainage system from the outlet to the 
corner of Huntington Avenue and Gainsborough Street, 
Boston, and that provision be made to defray the expense 
thereof. This matter w^as referred to the incoming Legis- 
lature by its [)redecessor ; the appropriation of a sufficient 
sum to enable the preliminary studies, borings, plans, etc., 
to be made regarding the high-level sewer, reported by the 
engineer as necessary for the relief of the Charles and 
Neponset districts; the appropriation of $142,500 to pro- 
vide additional pumping plant at each of the pumping sta- 
tions on the north metropolitan system, and also $75,000 to 
settle land damages on said system. 

These acts can be prepared and submitted to the com- 
mittee of your honorable body authorized to report thereon. 

The Appendix contains tables showing in detail the 

receipts and expenditures for the year, also the assets and 

liabilities to date. 

HOSEA KINGxMAN, 

TILLY HAYNES, 

GEORGE A. KIMBALL, 

Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners. 
Boi>TON, Oct. 1, 1897. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER 



AND 



SUPERINTENDENT. 



REPOKT OF CHIEF ENGINEER 



AND 



SUPERINTENDENT. 



Boston, Sept. 30, 1897. 

HosEA Kingman, Tilly IIaynes, George A. Kimball, 

Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners. 

Gentlemen: — Within the North Metropolitan area are now 
approximately 4'). 6 miles of completed Metropolitan Sewers. The 
location of these sewers and other data in relation to them are 
outlined in the following table : — 

Table showing Locations, Lengths and Sizes of Metropolitan Sewers within 
the North Metropolitan Area and the Number of Public and Special 
Connections made with the System in Each City and Town* 











Special Connections. 


CITY OR 




i 


an . 

o t- 




Number 


TOWN. 


Sire of Sewers. 


5° 




Character or Location 


in 






a 


3.2o 


of Connection. 


Opera. 








3 ■»* CO 




tiOD. 


Boston : — 












Deer Island, 


6' 3" to 9' 


1.367 


1 


- — 


. 


EttHt BoHtou, 


9' to 1", 


5.467 


3 


- 


. 


CharlcBtown, 


6'7"X7'5"to 1'3", . 


3.292 


3 


Navy Yard, 


1 


Wlnlhrop, 


9" 


2.864 


4 


- - 


- 


Chelsea, . 


8'4"X9'2" to2'l"x2'10", 


2.212 


2 


Rendering works, . 


1 


Everett, . 


8'2"x8'10"to4'8"X5'l", 


2.925 


2 


Metropolitan Water 
Board, blow-off. 


1 


Maiden, . 


3' 9"X4' 1" to 2', 


1.857 


4 


Metropolitan Water 
Board, blow-off. 


1 


Melrose, . 


1' 10"X2' 9" to 10", . 


3.493t 


3 


Private houses on 
sewer purchased 
from town of Mel- 
rose. 


5 


Cambridfire, 


5'2"X.'i 9"tol 3", . 


5.963 


17 


Slaughter-house, 


1 


Somerville, 


6'5"x7'2"to 1'10"X2'3", 


3.471 


4 


Slaughter-houses (3), 


1 


Medford, . 


4' 8" X 5' 1" to 10", . 


5.359 


14 


Private houses. 


2 


WinchfBter, . 


2' ll"x3'3"tol'3". 


6.403 


8 


Tannery, . 


1 


Stoneham, 


1' 3" to 10", 


0.010 


2 


- - 


- 


Woburn, . 


1' 10"x2'4"tol'S",. 


0.933 


3 


Glue factory, . 


1 


Arlington, 


1' 6" to 10", 


0.036 


3 


- — 


- 


Belraont, . 


- - 


- 


1 


. - 


— 


Wakefleld, 




- 


- 




- 




46.652t 


74 


15 



* The Metropolitan Sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 

t This includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Melrose and the com- 
pleted portions of Sections 50 and 51 (Wakefield and Stoneham branches), .35 of a mile of 
sewer remaining to be completed on these sections Sept. 30, 1897. 

X This includes 2.7 miles of Mystic Valley Sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn 
running parallel with the Metropolitan Sewer. 



METEOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



At the end of the year a length of about 44.3 miles is receiving 
sewage from a population of 193,000 people, or about 50 per cent, 
of the total resident population on the area. 

During the year extensions of the system have been made within 
the area to "Wakefield and Stoneham, as authorized by chapter 414 
of the Acts of 1896 and chapters 88 and 436 of the Acts of 1897. 
These acts provide a total appropriation of $45,000, and involve 
the purchase of a portion of the main sewer of the town of Melrose, 
consisting of small pipe and brick sewers, and extending from the 
corner of Pleasant Street and Wyoming Avenue to the corner of 
Lake Avenue and Tremont street, a distance of about .74 of a 
mile. 

Table showing Locations^ Lengths and Sizes of Sewer purchased from the 
Town of Melrose^ authorized by Chapter 414 of the Acts of 1896, and 
now known as Section 49 of the Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



LOCATION. 



Size. 



Diameter 
(Inches). 



Length 

(Feet). 



"Wyoming Avenue, 
Wyoming Avenue, 



Private land of Boston & Maine Railroad, Berwick 
and Grove Btreete, 

Myrtle, Essex and Tremont streets, . . . . 

Tremont Street to Lake Avenue, 

Total length, 



20 
24 

24 
18 
15 



29.24 
16.58 

794.81 

2,704.25 

343.16 

3,888.04 



Brick 

or 
Pipe. 



Brick. 
Brick. 

Pipe. 
Pipe. 
Pipe. 



Regulator and overflow at Wyoming Avenue, and 21 man-holes. 



Fifteen thousand dollars have already been paid to the town of 
Melrose for this length of sewer, which, since Nov. 25, 1896, has 
been operated as a part of the Metropolitan System. 

Contracts for the remainder of the extensions to Wakefield and 
Stoneham have been made as follows : — 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45, 



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6 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



On Sept. 30, 1897, there remained to be completed of the above 
contracts about .35 of a mile of pipe sewers. It is anticipated that 
Sections 50 and 51 will be complete and open for service about 
Dec. 1, 1897. The expenditures to date on the extensions have 
been as follows : — 



Purchase of a portion of the town sewers, 
Cost of construction to date, . 

Total expenditures to date. 



$15,000 00 
19,320 48 



$34,320 48 



Within the Charles River Valley area are now approximately 8.1 
miles of Metropolitan Sewers, which have been in operation since 
May 1, 1892, located as follows : — 

Table showing Locations, Lengths and Sizes of Metropolitan Sewers within 
the Charles River Valley Area and the Number of Public and Special 
Connections made with the System in Each City and Town. 





Size of Sewers. 


m 

i 

■5° 

"So 

a 


Public Connec- 
tions.Sepi.SO, 
1897. 


Special Connections. 


CITY OR 
TOWN. 


Character or Location 
of Connection. 


Number 

in 
Opera- 
tion. 


Part of Boston 
proper. 

Boston (Brigh- 
ton). 
Brookline, 

Newton, . 

Watertown, 

Waitliam, 


6' 6" to 5' 6", 

5'6"to4'2"X4'9", . 

5' 6" 

4' 2"X4' 9" to 3' 6"X4', . 
4'2"x4'9"to 3'11"X4'6", 
3'6"X4', . . . . 


1.500 

3.688 
0.127 
2.057 
0.725 
0.001 


8 

10 
1 
6 
5 
1 


Administration build- 
ing, Boston Park 
Department. 

Abattoirs, . 

Private houses, . 
Factory, 


1 
3 

2 
1 




8.098 


31 


7 



At the end of the year these sewers were receiving sewage from 
a population of 67,500, or about 62.9 per cent, of the total resident 
population on the area. 

No extensions of the Metropolitan Sewer in this valley have been 
made during the year. 

For the town of Watertown a siphon has been built under the 
Charles River from the abattoir grounds in Brighton to the arsenal 
grounds in East Watertown. The cost of this construction has 
been paid by the town of Watertown. 

In the Neponset River Valley, at the beginning of the year, 
sewers were constructed and in process of construction from Cen- 
tral Avenue in Dorchester to a point in Dedham near the West 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 7 

Roxbury line, a distance of about 6.75 miles. During the year 
this construction has been completed and the sewer opened for 
service through Dorchester and Hyde Park for a distance of 6.25 
miles. 

Chapter 83 of the Acts of 1897 provides an appropriation for 
the extension of the Neponset Valley Intercepter through West 
Roxbury to a point near the Brookline town line, the construction 
having been authorized by chapter 406 of the Acts of 1895. Con- 
tracts for this work were arranged early in the year for a distance 
of about .3.18 miles, of which 2.3 miles are now completed. It is 
anticipated that the whole construction will be finished on or about 
Jan. 1, 1898. 

The sewer, as designed to be built through West Roxbury, fol- 
lows in marsh lands along the northerly and easterly shore of the 
Charles River to Gardner Street ; thence easterly along the Brook- 
line water works' taking, in private and marsh lands, to Baker 
Street ; thence through St. Joseph's Cemetery, La Grange, Weld 
and Newfield streets, and in private land on easterly side of brook ; 
thence crossing Worley Street to a point in Weld Street about 
300 feet east of Gould Avenue. 



8 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



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1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



9 



Chapter 80 of the Acts of 1897 directs that branch sewers from 
the Neponset Valley Intercepter be extended across the Neponset 
River to and into the town of Milton to provide connections from 
her local sewers with the Metropolitan System. Three such river 
crossings have been built by '' day work" during the year, viz., at 
Mattapan Square, Central Avenue and Milton Lower Mills, at a 
total cost of $5,736.86. 

The total expenditure to date on account of the Neponset Valley 
Intercepting Sewer from Central Avenue, Dorchester, to Weld 
Street, West Roxbury, near the Brookline town line, has been 
$608,740.61. 

Table showing Locations, Lengths and Sizes of Metropolitan Sewers within 
the Nejjoiiset River Valley Area and the Number of Public Connections 
made with the System in Each City and Town. 



CITY OR TOWN. 


Size of Sewer. 


Length in 
Miles. 


Number 
of Public 
Connec- 
tions. 


Milton 

BoBtun (DorcheBter), 

Hyde Park 

Dedbam, 

Boston (West Roxbury), 


1' 8" to 8", 

3'X3' 1" to 2' 6"X2' 7" 

4' 6"X4' 7" to 4'x4' 1", .... 

4'X4' l"to3'9"X3' 10', . 

3' 9"X3' 10" to 1' 


0.05 
1.63 
3.09 
2.35 
2.94 


4 




10.06 


4 



A detailed statement relating to construction and maintenance 
during the year follows : — 

Section 50 (Wakefield Branch), Melrose and Wakefield. 

Location. — From a point at the junction of Lake Avenue and Tremont Street ex- 
tending to the junction of Tremont and Melrose streets; thence to 
the junction of Melrose and Belmont streets (passing under the stone 
arch bridge of the Boston & Maine Railroad) ; thence to the junction 
of Belmont and Franklin streets ; thence to a point on Greenwood 
Street at the Melrose and "Wakefield town line. 
Diameters of pipe sewers and length of each size : — 

1 foot 6 inches, . 250 feet. 

1 foot 3 inches 2,005 " 

1 foot, 1,078 " 

Diameters and length of brick sewers : — 

1 foot -6 inches by 1 foot 8 inches, 1,330 feet. 

Contractors. — John Booth Company of Winchester, Mass. 
Contractors^ Superintendent. — John Bozzo. 

State Assistants.* 
Assistant Engineer : Frank I. Capen. 
Inspectors : Michael F. Garra, Charles G. Waitt. 
Transitmen: Principal — William M. Stodder. 

Assistant— "William J. Fielding, John L. Hodgson. 

* The above-named State assistants have been employed for a part of the time only on 
Section 50. 



10 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Trench. 





18-lDch 




18-Inch 


by 


15-Inch 


Pipe 


20-Inch 


Pipe 


Sewer. 


Brick 

Sewer. 


Sewer. 



12-Inch 

Pipe 

Sewer. 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of under- 
drain (feet), 

Length of trench excavated to bottom of pile cap 
(feet) 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of 
underdrain (feet), 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of 
pile cap (feet) 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of 
underdrain (feet), 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of 
pile cap (feet) , 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet). 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic 
yards), 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, in- 
cluding sheeting left in, excavation and refilling 
below masonry, back-filling, etc., to date (Sept. 
30,1897) 



250.00 



11.00 

16.00 

2.65 
2.65 



1.10 



$2 05 



- 


1,800.00 


1,330.00 


- 


- 


12.00 


9.00 


- 


- 


16.00 


11.00 


_ 


3.15 


4.00 


3.15 


3.00 


1.30 


1.55 


$1 87* 


$1 27 



400.00 



18.00 



19.00 



3.15 
3.00 

2.00 



$1 20 



* Does not include piles. 

Character of Excavation. — From the junction of Lake Avenue and Tremont Street 
to a point 185 feet beyond, 6 inches road surfacing and sand to grade ; for the next 
650 feet, 6 inches road surfacing followed by filling and peat to grade ; for the next 
350 feet, 6 inches surfacing followed by fine sand to grade ; for the following 300 
feet, 6 inches road surfacing, then filling and peat to grade ; then to a point 30 feet 
southerly from the southerly end of Union Street, road surfacing, sand and gravel, 
then peat and sand to grade ; then to a point about 180 feet westerly from the junction 
of Melrose and Tremont streets, sand and gravel to grade; from this point to about 
30 feet southerly from the southerly line of Belmont Court, gravel with rock below ; 
then to a point at about the junction of Belmont and Franklin streets, coarse gravel 
and sand; from the junction of Franklin and Greenwood streets for about 450 feet 
northerly, loam, sand, gravel and about 8 feet of rock to grade. 

Maso7iry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... $10 50 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 12 00 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 5 50 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 7 00 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

3-inch, 390 feet. 

4-inch, 653 " 

6-inch, 2,315 " 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including under- 
drain, tarred paper, etc., to date (Sept 30, 1897), $2.29. 

Length of masonry completed, 1,330 feet. 

Masonry begun in trench June 4, 1897 ; finished Sept. 10, 1897. 
Approximate cost per linear foot of excavation and masonry, including 
labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to date (Sept. 
30, 1897), $4.31. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



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12 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

The ground-water was raised by a 4-inch centrifugal pump first 
located at a point 250 feet northerly from the junction of Lake 
Avenue and Tremont Street, and afterwards at the angle in Tre- 
mont Street about 1,000 feet from the above-named junction. The 
estimated maximum rate of pumping in 24 hours was 300,000 
gallons. 

Foundation. — On Tremont Street for 100 feet, beginning at a 
point about 600 feet south of the southerly line of Union Street, it 
was found necessary to excavate to a depth of about 1 foot 3 inches 
below grade and refill with gravel, the material removed consisting 
mainly of peat. 

A pile foundation was introduced for about 600 feet on Tre- 
mont Street. The bottom excavation has been either of sand, 
gravel or ledge for the remainder of the section. 

Precautions. — On Tremont Street, where the sewer was built in 
shallow cut, the sheeting was left in and |-inch tie-rods were 
placed across the sewer every 8 feet to guard against spreading 
of the completed structure. 

Section 51 (Stoneham Branch), Melrose and Stoneham. 

Location. — From a point in Tremont Street, Melrose, about 1,500 feet north of 
Lake Avenue, extending through private lands, Brunswick Way, 
Brunswick Park, Vinton and Melrose streets and Franklin Terrace 
to a point in Franklin Street, Stoneham, about 1.33 feet beyond 
the Melrose and Stoneham town line. 

Diameters and lengths of pipe sewer : — 

1-foot, 3,148.00 feet. 

10-inch, 975.37 " 

Contractors. — The A.W. Bryne Construction Company of Boston, Mass. 
Contractors^ Superintendent. — James L. Byrne. 
Contractors^ Principal Foreman. — J. Andrew Hunter. 

State Assistaiits. * 

Assistant Engineer : Frank I. Capen. 
Inspectors : Michael F. Garra, Charles G. Waitt. 
Transitmen : Principal — William M. Stodder. 

Assistant — William J. Fielding, John L. Hodgson. 

Trench and Tunnel. 

10-Inch and 12-Inch 
Pipe Sewer. 

Length of trench excavated to bottom of gravel refilling (feet) , . . 3,117.80 

Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of concrete (feet), . . . 110.00 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of gravel refilling (feet) , 9.50 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of gravel refilling (feet) , 14.50 

Average width, top of trench (feet), . . . . . . . 3.00 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 2.00 

♦ The above-named State assistants have been employed for part of the time only on 
Section 51. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 13 

10-Inch and 12-Inch 
Pipe Sewer. 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel excavation 

(feet) 23.00 

Greatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel excavation 

(feet), 23.00 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet) , 4.00 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), ... .79 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), ... .66 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including pipe, sheeting 

left in, excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., 

to Sept. 30, 1897, $1.24. 
Approximate cost of rock excavation per linear foot, $0.44. 
Approximate cost of tunnel excavation per linear foot, including pipe 

excavation and refilling l)elow masonry, back-filling, etc., to Sept. 

30, 1897, $1.41. 

Character of Excavatioti. — From a point at the beginning of the section on Tre- 
mont Street, about 450 feet south of Union Street, the excavation was open cut for 227 
feet through I foot loam, 7 feet sand and gravel ; then tunnel for 110 feet through sand 
and boulders; then open cut for 190 feet through 1 foot loam, 5 feet sand and fine 
gravel; then open cut for 150 feet through 1 foot loam, 10 feet soft brown peat; then 
open cut for 200 feet through 1 foot loam, 1 foot brown peat and 3 feet sand; then 
open cut for 548 feet through 1 foot loam, 6 feet sand and gravel ; then open cut for 
260 feet with 2 feet of street surfacing, 8 feet sand and coarse gravel ; then open cut 
for 865 feet through 1 foot loamy sand, 5 feet sand and gravel ; then open cut for 200 
feet through 2 feet street surfacing, 6 feet sand and coarse gravel ; then open cut for 
398 feet through 2 feet street surfacing and 4 feet ledge to a point corner of Franklin 
Street and Franklin Terrace. 

Masonry. 

Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... $13 00 
Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 15 00 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 6 00 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 7 00 

Diameter and length of underdrain : — 
6-inch 1,079 feet. 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including 

underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to Sept. 30, 1897, $0.36.* 
Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of tunnel, including 

imderdrain, tarred paper, etc., to Sept. 30, 1897, $3.69. f 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation, pipe and 

masonry, including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous 

items, to Sept. 30, 1897, $2.27. 

* This includes brick masonry at man-holes, concrete used in reinforcing pipe, etc. 
t Concrete used for back-filling. 



14 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



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1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 15 

A 6-inch piston pump, located at a point near Tremont Street, 
disposed of the ground-water for 1,000 feet. The estimated max- 
imum rate of pumping in 24 hours was 500,000 gallons. 

Foundation. — In Brunswick Park, for a distance of about 158 
feet, it was necessary to excavate in peat below the bottom of the 
masonry to a depth varying from 1 to 12 feet, and refill with cheap 
concrete. 

The bottom excavation has been generally of coarse gravel and 
sand. Where boulders and ledge have been encountered, the trench 
was excavated to a depth of 6 inches below grade and refilled with 
fine sand, on which the sewer pipe was laid. In coarse sand the 
trench was excavated to grade and the pipe laid on the firm, undis- 
turbed bottom, where underdrain was omitted. 

Precautions. — Under the Boston & Maine Railroad, heavy 
stringers, 40 feet in length, were placed under each rail while the 
operations under the railroad were in progress. 

Occasionally the pipe was surrounded with concrete to increase 
its strength and prevent leakage. 

Miscellaneous. — Some interference with the street-railroad traffic 
occurred on Franklin Street, where the sewer line was located in the 
centre of the track. 

A slight change in the sewer line was made to avoid a well in 
the property of Mr. F. A. Messenger. 



East Watertown Siphon, Watertown and Brighton. 

Location. — From the arsenal grounds of the United States government in Water- 
town, across and under the Charles River to a point in land owned by 
the Butchers* Slaughtering and Melting Association in Brighton. 

Co?itractors. — Perkins & White of Boston, Mass. 

State Assistants. 

Assistant Engineer : Frank I. Capen.* 
Inspector and Transitman : William M. Stodder. 



At the request of the sewerage commissioners of the town of 
Watertown a siphon was constructed under the Charles River for 
delivering sewage to the intercepting sewer in Brighton from an 
area of about 700 acres in the eastern portion of the town of 
Watertown. The work was designed and built by contract, under 
the direction of the office of the Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 
sion. The cost of the construction of the siphon and connected 
structures was paid by the town of Watertown. 

* Employed for a portion of the time only on this work. 



16 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

Character of Structure and Method of Construction. — The 
siphon consists of about 250 linear feet of 12-inch, extra-heavy, 
cast-iron water pipe, laid about 3 feet below the proposed improved 
channel of Charles River, at a depth of about 10 feet below low 
water of the stream. It is a level pipe, with masonry shafts and 
stop-plank chamber on both shores. On the Brighton side the 
shaft is connected with the Metropolitan Sewer by a 7-foot length 
of 24-inch brick sewer. 

The masonry shafts were constructed by first driving coffer- 
dams of 4-inch tongued and grooved hard pine timber in 32-foot 
lengths. These coffer-dams were lined with concrete and brick 
masonry, the finished inside dimensions being about 4 by 5 feet by 
30 feet in depth. For laying the pipe a trench about 10 feet wide 
was dredged across the river. For securing the pipe at grade, piles 
were driven in bents of 2 every 6 feet. Divers attached cross-ties 
to these piles above and below the pipe. The pipe with leaded 
joints was lowered into place in two lengths, and the connecting 
joint at the middle of the river made with cold lead by divers. 
This joint was further reinforced by iron straps and surrounded by 
concrete. 

Only one-half of the clear water-way of the river was obstructed 
at any one time. The work of construction was begun in October, 
1896, and completed in May, 1897. 

Cost. — The total cost, including engineering, inspection and 
miscellaneous items, was $9,591.67. 

Section 12, Neponset Valley System CDay Work), Dor- 
chester. 

Location. — From the end of the Dorchester Intercepting Sewer, built by the city 
of Boston, to Central Avenue, through Central Avenue and westerly 
through the property of the Tileston& Hollingsworth Company (Eagle 
Mills), across an arm of the mill-pond and private land to a point in 
the property of Abba M. Martine. 

Diameter and length of sewer : — 
3 feet by 3 feet 1 inch, 985 feet. 

Assistants. 

Assistant Engineer : Frank?I. Capen. 
Foreman : Patrick McCarthy. 
Transitman : William M. Stodder. 

Trench and Tunnel. 

3 Feet by 3 Feet 
1 Inch Sewer. 

Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . . 602 00 

Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . . 383.00 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 16.00 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 18.00 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 6.30 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 17 

3 Feet by 3 Feet 
1 Inch Sewer. 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet) 6.10 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel excavation 

(feet) 26.00 

Greatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel excavation 

(feet) 30.00 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet) , 5.00 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . 4.00 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . 1.00 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left in, 
excavation and refilling Ijelow masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, $10.36.* 
Approximate cost of tunnel excavation per linear foot, including exca- 
vation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to completion 
of work, $17.62. 
Character of Excavation. — For the first 212 feet the excavation was in gravel and 
Band, with rock in the Imttoni of the trench, followed by about 383 feet of rock tun- 
nel ; then for 230 feet across the mill-pond there were 7 feet of filling, 2 feet of mud 
and gravel to grade. For the remainder of the distance the excavation was in loam, 
filling and gravel. 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size: — 

4-inch, 485 feet. 

8-inch 390 •• 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including under- 
dniin, tarred paper, etc , to completion of work, $6.64. 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of tunnel, including under- 
drain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $7.26. 

Length of masonry completed (trench), 602 feet. 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 383 " 

Masonry was begun in trench May 2, 1896 ; finished Dec. 5, 1896. 
Masonry begun in tunnel Sept. 23, 1896 ; finished Nov. 24, 1896. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 
including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to com- 
pletion of work, $21.51. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 12 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to this 
year, see the eighth annual report. 



Excavation. — The ground-water in the tunnel was raised by 
ejectors ; in the open-cut work crossing the mill-pond an 8-inch 
centrifugal pump was used. The tunnel heading referred to in last 
year's report as having been commenced on Aug. 25, 1896, was 
continued to meet the heading from the opposite direction. The 
excavation was wholly in very hard rock, and was worked with 
steam drills. 

In driving the tunnel increased care was used because of its 
location under buildings and alongside water filters and other works 
of the Tileston & HoUingsworth Company. Its peculiar location 

* Thle does not include the cost of the embankment and riprap across the mill-pond. 



18 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

and the unusual hardness of the rock through which the tunnel was 
driven added much to the cost of the work. 

Cost. — The cost of this section, exclusive of engineering, was 
approximately $21,190. 



Section 13 (Neponset Valley System), Dorchester. 

Location. — From a point in private land, on the southerly bank of the Neponset 
River, about 1,000 feet west of Central Avenue, extending westerly in 
proposed streets through private land of John Conness and Thomas 
Liversidge estate to River Street, a distance of about 2,900 feet ; thence 
in River Street to about 120 feet east of the centre line of Fremont 
Street. 

Diameter and length of sewer : — 
3 feet by 3 feet 1 inch, 3,800 feet. 

Contractor, — Harry P. Nawn of Roxbury, Mass. Mr. Nawn has acted as superin- 
tendent. 
Contractor's Principal Foreman. — John EUwood. 

State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer : C. Barton Pratt. 
Inspectors : S. B. Horton, John D. Collins. 
Transitmen: Principal — Charles Kincaid, G. E. Stratton. 
Assistant — M.F.Sanborn. 

Trench and Tunnel. 

3 Feet by 3 Feet 
1 Inch Sewer. 

Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . . 3,408.00 

Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . . 392.00 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of concrete (feet), . 11.80 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of concrete (feet) , . 20.90 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 5.50 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 5.40 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel concrete 

(feet), . . . ' . . 18.60 

Greatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel concrete 

(feet), 26.80 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet), 5.70 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . . 2.40 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . . 1.30 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left in, 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, |3.95. 
Approximate cost of tunnel excavation per linear foot to completion 
of work, $7. 
Character of Excavation. — For 180 feet from beginning of section, 1 foot loam, 
then sand, gravel and boulders to grade ; then for 250 feet, 1 foot loam, the forma- 
tion below this being sand and gravel, followed by ledge averaging about 5 feet in 
depth to grade ; thence for 318 feet, 1 foot loam followed by sand and gravel to 
grade; thence for 250 feet, a rock tunnel; the rock tunnel then continues for 142 feet 
through sand, gravel, clay and boulders. The trench begins again with 1 foot loam 

* The above-named State assistante have been employed for part of the time only on 
Section 13. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



19 



6 feet sand and gravel, then fine sand to grade, extending for about 500 feet, chang- 
ing here to loam, sand and gravel for 1,500 feet, at which point the excavation was 
through 1^ feet road-bed, then sand and gravel with a bottom of ledge for 220 feet, 
changing again to road-bed, then sand, clay and gravel for 440 feet to the end of the 
section. 

Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench). 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel). 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel). 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), . 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . 
Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch, 

8-inch, 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including un- 
derdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $4.24. 
Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of tunnel, including un- 
derdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $5 02. 

Length of masonry completed (trench), 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 

Masonry begun in trench April 16, 1896; finished Jan. 18, 1897. 
Masonry l)egun in tunnel Nov. 20, 1896 ; finished Jan. 15, 1897. 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 
including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 
completion, $8.94. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 13 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to 
this year, see the eighth annual report. 



$12 50 


15 00 


14 00 


16 00 


5 00 


7 00 


904 feet. 


2,896 " 



3,408 feet. 
392 " 



Excavation. 



Opening No. 2. 



Opening No. 4. 



Character of opening, 

Number of tunnel headings, 

Date of starting, 

Point of continuing from laat 
year's work, . 

Point of ending, . 

Date of completion, 

Length, 

Ordinary progress per week, . 

Appliances used. 

Size of gang ordinarily em- 
ployed 



Tunnel 

One, 

July 8, 1896 

836 feet from beginning of sec- 
tion. 

906 feet from beginning of sec- 
tion. 

Nov. 10, 1896 

70 feet,' 

9 feet 

Wheelbarrows 

8 men, 



Tunnel. 

One. 

July 8, 1896. 

986 feet from beginning of 
section. 

906 feet from beginning of 
section. 

Nov. 10, 1896. 

80 feet. 

16 feet. 

Wheelbarrows. 

8 men. 



A 6-inch centrifugal pump, located at the lower end of the sec- 
tion, handled the ground-water. 



20 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Foundation. — The formation throughout this section has been 
of ledge, sand, gravel and clay. An American concrete invert, 6 
inches in depth on the bottom and 8 inches in thickness on the sides 
at the springing line, has been laid, on which was built a 4-inch 
invert of brick masonry. The arch of the sewer throughout the 
section is 8 inches in thickness. 

Surplus Material. — The surplus rock has been used in the con- 
struction of roads in the vicinity of the sewer, the surplus earth for 
filling near-by low lands. 

Section 14 (Neponset Valley System), Dorchester. 
This section was completed prior to Sept. 30, 1896. 

Section 15 (Neponset Valley System), Dorchester and Hyde 

Park. 

Location. — From a point in River Street, Dorchester, about 270 feet west of Oakland 
Street, extending westerly through River Street to a point in Hyde 
Park about 20 feet east of Wachusett Street. 
Diameters of sewers and length of each size : — 

2 feet 6 inches by 2 feet 7 inches, 1,464.00 feet. 

4 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 7 inches, 1,006.30 " 

Contractor. — Harry P. Nawn of Roxbury, Mass. Mr. Nawn has acted as superin- 
tendent. 
Contractor's Principal Foreman. — William Hall. 

State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer : C. Barton Pratt. 
Inspectors : Michael F. Garra, Charles G. Waitt. 

Traasitmen: Principal — Henry Cleary, G. E. Stratton, Charles Kincaid. 
Assistant — M. F. Sanborn, Walter Cleary. 

Irench and Tunnel. 



2 Feet 6 
Inches by 

2 Feet 7 
Inches 
Sewer. 



4 Feet 8 

Inches by 

4 Feet 7 

Inches 

Sewer. 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 

Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of underd rain (feet), . 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of concrete (feet), . 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of concrete (feet), 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet) 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel con- 
crete (feet), 

Greatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel con- 
crete (feet), 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet) 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting 
left in, excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, 
etc., to completion of work, 

Approximate cost of tunnel excavation per linear foot, including 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc, to 
completion of work, 



1,464.00 

15.60 

17.40 

5.50 

5.00 



3.00 



$5 60 



507.00 

499.30 

18.90 

19.20 

8.60 

6.70 

24.90 

27.40 
7.00 
5.40 
2.00 



$9 46 



12 00 



* The above-named State assistants have been employed for part of the time only on 
Section 15. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



21 



Character of Excavation. — For the first 60 feet, 2 feet street surfacing, clay, sand 
and gravel to grade ; for the next 180 feet, 2 feet street surfacing, 4 feet sand, clay 
and gravel with ledge in the bottom ; then for 272 feet, 2 feet surfacing, 4 feet sand, 
then sand, gravel and boulders to grade ; for the next 356 feet, street surfacing, 2 feet 
Band, gravel, and boulders on top of ledge varying in depth from 1 to 9 feet; then for 
the next 738 feet, 1 foot street surfacing, 1 foot loam, followed by sand, gravel, clay 
and boulders to grade; for the next 174 feet, 1 foot filling, 2 feet sandy loam and 
gravel, 7 feet sand and gravel, then sand, gravel, clay and boulders with ledge in the 
bottom ; then for 191 feet, street filling, 1 foot sandy loam, 6 feet coarse sand, then 
Band, gravel, clay and boulders with ledge in the bottom. The 499.30 feet of tunnel 
was through ledge. 

Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), . . $12 50 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . . 15 00 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), . . . 14 00 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . . 16 00 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), . . . 5 00 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . . . 6 00 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), . . . 7 00 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . . . 8 00 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch, 1,505.30 feet. 

8-inch 884.00 *< 

10-inch, 64.00 " 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including 
underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $4.20. 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of tunnel, including 
underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $6.59. 

Length of masonry completed (trench), 1,971.00 feet. 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 499.30 *' 

Masonry begun in trench April 21, 1896; finished Nov. 21, 1897. 
Masonry begun in tunnel Oct. 26, 1896 ; finished Dec. 22, 1896. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and ma- 
sonry, including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous 
items, to completion of work, $12.72. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 15 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to this 
year, see the eighth annual report. 

Excavation. 



Opening No. 3. 



Character of opening, 

Number of tunnel headings, 

Date of starting, 

Points of continuing from last year's work, 

Points of ending, 

Date of finishing, 

Length, 

Ordinary progress per week. 

Appliances used 

Size of gang ordinarily employed, 



Tunnel. 

Two. 

July 28, 1896. 

About opposite the centre line of Holmfield 

Avenue and about 176 feet west of Holmfield 

Avenue. 
About 2,209 feet from beginning of section, going 

west; 1,971 feet from beginning of section, 

going east. 
Oct. 20, 1896. 
62 feet. 
24 feet. 

Steam derrick. 
12 men. 



22 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



The ground-water from the excavation was raised by a 6-inch 
centrifugal pump located at a well about 1,400 feet from the 
beginning of the section ; pulsometers were used at the shaft at 
the end of the section near Wachusett Street and near Holmfield 
Avenue. 

Foundation. — The open-cut excavation was generally in sand, 
gravel, boulders and ledge ; the tunnel excavation was in rock. In 
both the trench and tunnel work, an invert of American concrete, 
about 6 inches in thickness on the bottom and sides, was built, on 
which was laid a Portland brick invert. 

Surplus Material. — The surplus material from the excavations 
has been used in filling low lands adjacent to the line of the sewer. 
A portion of the surplus rock has been used in road-building near 
the sewer line. 

Section 16 (Neponset Valley System), Hyde Park. 

Location. — From a point in River Street about 20 feet east of Wachusett Street, 
extending south-westerly through River Street, across the New Eng- 
land Railroad and railroad property, then into River Street about 
opposite Radcliffe Road, extending through River Street to a point 
about 620 feet west of Wood Avenue. 
Diameters of sewers and length of each size : — 

4 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 7 inches, . . ' 1,710.00 feet. 

4 feet 2 inches by 4 feet 3 inches, . . . . . . . 669.29 " 

Contractor. — Harry P. Nawn of Roxbury, Mass. Mr. Nawn has acted as superin, 

tendent. 
Contractor's Principal Foremen. — William Hall, Peter Mally. 

State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer: C. Barton Pratt. 

Inspectors ; Michael F. Garra, S. B. Horton, Charles G. Waitt, H. M. Woodward, 

George F. Greenlaw. 
Transitmen: Principal — Henry Cleary, G. E. Stratton, Charles Kincaid. 
Assistant — Walter Cleary, M. F. Sanborn. 

Trench and Tunnel. 



4 Feet 6 
Inches by 

4 Feet 7 
Inches 
Sewer. 


4 Feet 2 

Inches by 

4 Feet 3 

Inches 

Sewer. 


1,247.00 


669.29 


463.00 


- 


26.50 


22.20 


29.00 


27.00 


9.00 


8.60 


7.10 


6.60 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 
Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 
Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of concrete (feet), 
G-reatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of concrete (feet), 

Average width, top of trench (feet) , 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 



* The above-named State assistants have been employed for part of the time only on 
Section 16. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



23 



Trench and Tunnel — Concluded. 



4 Feet 6 
Inches by 
4 Feet 7 
Inches 
Sewer. 



4 Feet 2 
Inches by 
4 Feet 3 
Inches 
Sewer. 




5.80 



$12 45 



Average depth from surface of ground to, bottom of tunnel con- 
crete (feel), ' 

Greatest depth from purface of ground to bottom of tunnel con- 
crete (feet), 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet), 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Approximate cost of tr<nch per linear foot, including sheeting left 
in, excavation and refilling below masonry, back-tilling, etc., to 
completion of work 

Approximate cost of tunnel excavation per linear foot, including 
excavation and redlling below masonry, back filling, etc., to 
completion of work, 



Character of Excavation. —From a point at the beginning of the section in River 
Street about 20 feet east of Wacbusett Street, the excavation was by tunnel through 
ledge for a distance of 207 feet ; then open cut through sand and gravel on top to 
ledge from 1 to 27 feet in depth and for a distance of 280 feet; then open cut with 
Band, gravel and boulders for 43 feet; tunnel under the New England Railroad 
tracks near River-street station for 118 feet with sand, gravel and boulders; open cut 
for 142 feet through 2 feet loam, 8 feet sand and gravel, then fine sand to grade; tun- 
nel for 84 feet with sand, gravel and boulders ; open cut for 138 feet with 2 feet street 
surfacing, 2 feet filling, 2 feet loam, 8 feet sand and gravel, then fine sand to grade; 
tunnel for 54 feet under the Norfolk Suburban Street Railroad through fine sand. 
For the next 900 feet, an open cut with 2 feet street surfacing, 5 feet filling, then 
sand and gravel with boulders to grade.. The remaining 413 feet were excavated 
through 2 feet surfacing, then sand, gravel and boulders to ledge, averaging 10 feet 
in depth. 

Maso7iry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... $12 50 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 14 00 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 500 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 7 00 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch, 721 feet. 

8-inch 1,658 «♦ 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench and tunnel, in- 
cluding underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, 
$6.60. 

Length of masonry completed (trench), 1,916.29 feet. 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 463.00 " 

Masonry begun in trench May 30, 1896 ; finished April 27, 1897. 
Masonry begun in tunnel June 23, 1896; finished March 16, 1897. 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 

including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 

completion of work, $19.96. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 16 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to 
this year, see the eighth annual report. 



24 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



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1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 25 

A 6-inch Knowles pump located at a well in the vicinity of 
Wood Avenue handled the ground-water. 

Delay. — Work on this section was suspended for 35 days, from 
Dec. 4, 189G, to Jan. 8, 1897, inclusive, because of a claim made 
by the Tileston & HoUingsworth Company that the sewer operations 
had damaged one of the chimneys of their Mattapan Mills. It was 
found that tlie brickwork of the core and outer shell had been 
bonded in such a manner as to produce a crack when the chimney 
expanded. A joint report of three experts established that the 
cause of the trouble was primarily very faulty workmanship in the 
construction of the chimney. The chimney was repaired at the 
expense of the contractor who built it. 

Foundation. — Between Wood Avenue and Blake Street, where 
the soil in the bottom of the trench was of running sand, it was 
found necessary to excavate a foot below the bottom of the 
masonry and refill with gravel ; elsewhere the bottom excavation 
was in sand, gravel and ledge. Generally an American concrete 
invert, 6 inches in depth on the bottom and 8 inches in thickness 
at the springing line, was built, with a 4-inch invert of Portland 
brick masonry. 

Difficulties. — Under the railroad, between Radcliffe Road and 
Blake Street, a very lively spring within the line of the trench 
occasioned some trouble. At this point a Portland concrete 
invert reinforced by side-walls of Portland brick masonry was 
built. 

Miscellaneous. — To avoid a large water pipe on the southerly 
side of River Street, the sewer line was moved to the northerly 
side of the street, between Radcliffe Road and the end of the 
section. 

Surplus Material. — The surplus material has been used in fill- 
ing low lands adjacent to the line of the sewer. The surplus 
rock has been used in road-building in the vicinity. 



Section 17 (Neponset Valley System), Hyde Park. 

Location. — From a point in River Street, Hyde Park, near Mattapan Mills, about 
620 feet west of Wood Avenue, extending westerly through River 
Street and private lands, along Neponset River to a point near the 
junction of Metropolitan Avenue and. Pierce Street. 

Diameter and length of sewer : — 
4 feet 3 inches by 4 feet 4 inches, 1,768.72 feet. 

Contractors. — George R. Newman & Co. of Providence, R. I. 
Contractors' Superintendent. — Charles L. Mowry. 
Contractors' Principal Foreman. — William Mahoney. 



26 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



State Assistants,* 
Assistant Engineer: C. Barton Pratt. 

Inspectors : John D. Collins, Michael F. Garra, George F. Greenlaw. 
Transitmen: Principal — Henry Cleary, G. E. Stratton, Charles Kincaid. 
Assistant — Walter Cleary, M. F. Sanborn. 



Trench and Tunnel. 



4 Feet 3 Inches by 

4 Feet 4 Inches 

Sewer. 

1,282.72 

486.00 

16.00 

31.30 

7.60 

7.20 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 
Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), 
Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of concrete (feet). 
Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of concrete (feet). 

Average width, top of trench (feet) , 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel concrete 

(feet), 30.40 

Greatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel concrete 

(feet), 32.60 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet) , 5.30 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . 4.40 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . 1.50 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left 
in, excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to 
completion of work, $9.35. 

Approximate cost of tunnel excavation per linear foot, including ex- 
cavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, $12.75. 

Character of Excavation. — The 486 feet of tunnel in River Street at beginning of 
section was through very hard ledge. The open cut which began in proposed street 
in Sumner estate was through about 1.5 feet loam, then sand and gravel with ledge 
to grade. The ledge was very irregular, varying in depth from 1 to 19 feet for a dis- 
tance of 711 feet. The last 85 feet were excavated through loam, then sand, gravel 
and clay to grade. 



Masonry/. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel). 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), . 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench) , . 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 
4-inch, 



6-inch, 



$12 50 

13 85 

14 GO 

15 65 
5 00 

5 85 

6 75 

7 50 

486 feet. 



295 *« 
8-inch, 988 '' 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including under- 
drain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $6.01. 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of tunnel, including under- 
drain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $6.94. 

* The above-named State assistants have been employed a part of the time only on 
Section 17. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



27 



Length of masonry completed (trench), 1,282.72 feet. 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 486.00 " 

Masonry begun in trench June 29, 1896 ; finished Jan. 30, 1897. 
Masonry begun in tunnel Feb. 1, 1897; finished April 14, 1897. 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 

including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 

completion of work, $19.33. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 17 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to 
this year, see the eighth annual report. 

Excavation. 



Opening No. 1. 



Opening No. 2. 



Character of opening, . 
Number of tunnel headings. 
Date of starting, 
Point of continuing from last 
year's work. 

Point of ending, 



Date of BnlHbing, . 

Length 

Ordinary progress per week, 
Appliances used, . 

Size of gang ordinarily em- 
ployed. 



Open cut 

May 14. 1896, 

Near Neponset River in 
estate of Caroline E. 
Mowry. 

Near the junction of Metro- 
politan Avenue and Plerco 
Street. 



Nov. 16, 1896, 
1,282.72 feet,. 

50 feet, 

Bteam derrick and Brown 

Trench Machine. 
45 men 



Tunnel. 

Two. 

May 19, 1896. 

About 86 feet each way from 
shaft; shaft 230 feet from 
beginning of section. 

At the lower end of section 
and at a point 486 feet from 
beginning of section in pro- 
posed street in Sumner 
estate. 

Feb. 4, 1897. 

486 feet. 

14 feet. 
Steam derrick. 

15 men. 



The ground-water has been taken care of by a 4-inch centrifugal 
pump located in a well near the westerly line of the Field estate 
and a No. 3 pulsometer in a shaft in River Street. 

Delay. — Operations on this section were suspended for 27 days, 
Dec. 4 to Dec. 31, 189G, inclusive, because of a complaint of the 
Tileston & IloUingsworth Company, in which it was alleged that 
our blasting operations had damaged one of the chimneys of their 
Mattapan Mills. This complaint is further referred to in report 
on Section 16. 

Foiindation. — The bottom of the trench was principally of 
ledge. A 4-inch brick invert has been laid in a bed of American 
concrete, 6 inches in depth on the bottom and from 6 to 8 inches 
in thickness at the springing line, for the whole section. The 
arch is of 8-inch American brick masonry. 

Precautions. — The sewer arch was reinforced with concrete for 
about 112 feet at the end of the section, where the sewer is built 
through overflowed area near the Neponset River. 

Surplus Material. — The surplus material from the excavations 
has been used in filling low lands adjacent to the line of the sewer. 



28 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 



Section 18 (Neponset Valley System), Hyde Park. 

Location. — From near the junction of Metropolitan Avenue and Pierce Street, Hyde 
Park, south-westerly through private and railroad lands, through 
Station Street to a point in Walnut Street about 400 feet south-west 
of Fairmount Avenue. 
Diameter and length of sewer : — 

4 feet 3 inches by 4 feet 4 inches, 2,719 feet. 

Contractors. — Troy Public "Works Company of Troy, N. Y. 

Contractors' Superintendent. — The work was superintended by Mr. M. McDonough, 

a member of the above-named corporation. 
Contractors' Principal Foremen. — John McKenzie, James J. Cook, Walter Fer- 
guson, John Jefferson. 

State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson. 

Inspector : Caleb Kimball. 

Transitmen : Principal (in charge of lines and grades) — S. G. Packard. 

Principal (in charge of records) — J. L. Lee, Jr. 

Assistant — L. D. Hatch, Harry Kincaid. 



Trench and Tunnel. 

4 Feet 3 Inches by 

4 Feet 4 Inches 

Sewer. 

Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet) , . . 2,630.00 

Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of underd rain (feet), . . 89.00 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 16.50 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 24.00 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 7.70 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 6.70 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel excavation 

(feet), 23.00 

Greatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel excavation 

(feet), 23.00 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet) , 8.20 

"Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards) , . . 4.80 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards) , . . . 2.50 
Approximate cost per linear foot, including sheeting left in, excava- 
tion and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to completion 
of work, ^7.75. 

Character of Excavation. — At the beginning of the section the formation con- 
sisted of 2 feet peat, then sand, gravel and boulders to grade. Ledge was encountered 
in the bottom about 20 feet from the beginning. Four hundred and fifty feet from 
the beginning, 1 foot sand, 2 feet gravel, 1 foot peat, 3 feet gravel, ledge to grade. 
The ledge ran out near the foot of West Street. From West Street for the next 600 
feet, 2 feet peat, then sand, gravel and clay to grade ; next 150 feet, 2 feet peat, 2 feet 
clay, fine wet sand to grade ; at foot of Walter Street, 2 feet peat, 3 feet sand and gravel, 
fine wet sand to grade; opposite New England Railroad station, 8 inches gravel, 
3 feet sand, 5 feet loamy gravel, 2 feet clay, 1 foot peat, yellow sandy clay to grade ; 
Station Street, 200 feet south of Fairmount Avenue, I foot surfacing, 8 feet filling 
(sand and gravel), 3 feet peat, 6 feet sand and clay, running sand below; under the 
railroad tracks near Walnut Street, sand and gravel with a little clay. 

* The above-named State assistants have been employed for part of the time only on 
Section 18. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUxMENT— No. 45. 



29 



Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... $12 50 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 14 50 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard 5 50 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 7 00 

Diameters of undcrdrain laid and length of each size : — 

4-inch, 100 feet. 

6-inch 500 «* 

8-inch, 1,248 '« 

lO-inch 874 " 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench and tunnel, 
includinu; undcrdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, 
16.60. 

Length of masonry completed (trench) 2,630 feet. 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 89 " 

Masonry begun in trench May 22, 1896 ; finished Nov. 9, 1896. 
Masonry begun in tunnel Oct. 17, 1896 ; finished Nov. 7, 1896. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 
including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 
comi)letion of work. §14.80. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 18 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to 
this year, see the eighth annual report. 

Excavation. 



Opening No. 4. 



Chai-acter of opening, . 

Number of tunnel headings, 

Date of Btarting, . 

Point of continuing from last year's work 

Point of ending, . 

Date of tiniHbing, 

Lenijth, .... 

Ordinary progress per week, 

Appliances used, 

Size of gang ordinarily employed, 



Tunnel. 

One. 

Aug. 31, 1896. 

93 feet from end of section. 

134 feet from end of section. 

Oct. 16, 1896. 

41 feet. 

20 feet. 

Derrick and wheelbarrows. 

10 men. 



The ground-water was raised by a 6-inch centrifugal pump 
located about GOO feet north of the New England Railroad station, 
which was kept in continuous operation until the completion of the 
work. In addition to this, a pulsometer located in a well on Sec- 
tion 19, about 20 feet beyond the end of Section 18, assisted in the 
disposal of the ground-water for three or four weeks while opera- 
tions were in progress in the tunnel. The estimated greatest rate 
of pumping in 24 hours was 400,000 gallons. 

Foundation. — The bottom of the excavation consisted of sand 
and gravel, which ran freely. A concrete invert was used through- 
out the section. 



30 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Difficulties. — The tunnel under the railroad was driven with 
great caution and at a slow rate, owing to the sand and gravel 
running very freely. This tunnel was back-filled solidly to the 
lagging with American concrete. 

Section 19 (Neponset Valley System), Hyde Park. 

Location. — From a point in Walnut Street, Hyde Park, about 400 feet south-west of 
Fairmount Avenue, extending south-westerly through Walnut Street 
and private lands, under New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road, to Business Street and to a point in Business Street about 625 
feet south-west of Barry Place. 
Diameters of sewers and length of each size : — 

4 feet 3 inches by 4 feet 4 inches, . 1,290 feet. 

4 feet by 4 feet 1 inch, 1,361 ♦* 

Contractors. — Geo. S. Good & Co. of Lock Haven, Pa. 

Contractors^ Superintendent. — F. C. Hitchcock. 

Contractors' Principal Foremen. — Thomas Ferguson, Michael Coleman. 

State Assistants.* 
Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson. 
Inspectors : John Craib, J. E. Savage. 
Transitmen : Principal (in charge of lines and grades) — S. G. Packard. 

Principal (in charge of records) — J. L. Lee, Jr. 

Assistant — L. D. Hatch, Harry Kincaid, B. W. Torrey. 

Trench and Tunnel. 



4 Feet 3 
IncheB by 
4 Feet 4 
Inches 
Sewer. 



4 Feet by 
4 Feet 1 

Inch 
Sewer. 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 

Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 

Grreatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet) 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel under- 
drain (feet), 

Greatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel under- 
drain (feet), 



Average width of tunnel excavation (feet) 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards) , . 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Approximate cost of trench and tunnel per linear foot, including 
sheeting left in, excavation and refilling below masonry, back- 
filling, etc., to completion of work 



1,264.00 

97.00 

15.00 

18.00 

7.00 

6,50 

18.00 

18.00 
6.60 
4.50 
1.50 

$4 OOt 



* The above-named State assistants have been employed for part of the time only on 
Section 19. 
t No price bid for tunnel work by contractor. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 31 

Character of Excavation. — At the beginning of section, 1 foot street surfacing, 
then sand, gravel and clay to a depth of about 18 feet, then mixture of clay and sand 
to grade. At Bridge Street, 1 foot surfacing, 4 feet gravel and sand, ledge to grade. 
Opposite corner Bleakie's Mills, 1 foot loam, 6 feet loam and gravel, 5 feet hard clay 
and gravel, hard-pan below. Barry Place, 1 foot surfacing, 6 feet gravel, 3 feet fine 
sand, gravel below. At a point about 100 feet from Barry Place in Business Street, 6 
inches macadam, 2 feet sand, gravel and loam, 2 feet peat, fine running sand to grade. 
At end of section, 6 inches macadam, clay, gravel and loam to grade. 



Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar; per cubic yard $12 GO 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 14 00 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 6 00 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 7 50 

Diameters of nnderdrain laid and length of each size : — 

G-incb 315 feet. 

8-incli 813 " 

10-inch, 1,519 «* 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench and tunnel, 
including underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, 
§(5.80. 

Length of masonry completed (trench), 2,554 feet. 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 97 ** 

Masonry was begun in trench June 12, 1896; finished Jan. 4, 1897. 

Masonry was begun in tunnel Dec. 3, 1896; finished Jan. 1, 1897. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and ma- 
sonry, Including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous 
items, to completion of work, $10.40. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 19 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to this 
year, see the eighth annual report. 



32 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



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1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 33 

The ground-water was raised by a 6-iDch centrifugal pump near 
Bleakie's Mill, a 2-inch pump near the railroad at Barry Place and 
a pulsometer in Business Street, 150 feet south of Barry Place. 
The estimated maximum rate of pumping in 24 hours was 500,000 
gallons. 

Foundation. — For a distance of about 350 feet on Business 
Street, south of Barry Place, where the formation consisted of 
fine wet sand, it was necessary to excavate from 6 to 12 inches 
below grade and refill with gravel. At all other points the excava- 
tion has been in sand, gravel, clay and some ledge. 

An invert of American concrete has been used throughout the 
greater portion of the section. 

Miscellaneous. — Under the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad tracks the arch of the sewer in tunnel was back-filled to 
the lagging with American concrete. 

The line of the sewer on Business Street was changed to the 
easterly side of the street. 

Surphis Material. — The surplus excavated material has been 
used in filling adjacent low lands. 

Section 20 (Neponset Valley System), Hyde Park. 

Loco/ion. — From a point in Business Street, Hyde Park, about 625 feet south-west 
of Barry Street, extending south-westerly through Business and West 
River streets to a point about 25 feet east of Atherton Street. 

Diameter and length of sewer : — 
4 feet by 4 feet 1 inch 3,212 feet. 

Contractors. — George S. Good & Co. of Lock Haven, Pa. 

Contractors' Super inteiident. — F..C. Hitchcock. 

Contractors' Principal Foreman. — H. H. DeGrofft. 

State Assistants.** 
Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson. 
Inspectors : Geo. A. Chase, John Craib. 
Transitraen : Principal (in charge of lines and grades) — S. G. Packard. 

Principal (in charge of records) —J. L. Lee, Jr. 

Assistant — L. D. Hatch, Harry Kincaid, B. W. Torrey. 

Trench. 

4 Feet by 4 Feet 
1 Inch Sewer. 

Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . . 3,212.00 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 16.80 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 20.00 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 8.00 

Average wadth, bottom of trench (feet), 6.70 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . 4.50 
Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left in, 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, $3.85. 



* The above-named State assistants have been employed for part of the time only on 
Section 20. 



34 



METKOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Character of Excavation. — Yor the first 250 feet, 6 inches macadam, 1 foot gravel, 
8 feet sand and gravel, then clay and gravel to grade. At the beginning of the 
original opening, 250 feet from beginning of section, 8 inches street surfacing, 8 feet 
sand and gravel, then sand and gravel with considerable clay to grade. At a point 
100 feet from Business Street, on River Street, 1 foot surfacing, 7 feet sand and 
gravel, fine sand below. At Ellis Street, 1 foot surfacing, 8 feet sand and gravel, then 
sand and clay to grade. Two hundred feet south of Church Street, 1 foot surfacing, 
6 feet gravel, 1 foot sand and clay, then hard-pan to grade. Opposite Readville 
Street, 1 foot macadam, 5 feet coarse gravel, 5 feet gravel and sand, fine sand to 
grade, the sand in the bottom of the excavation being quite wet. Three hundred feet 
beyond Readville Street, 1 foot surfacing, 4 feet gravel and sand, fine running sand to 
grade, this formation existing to the end of the section. 

Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard $12 00 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 14 00 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 6 00 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 7 50 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch 375 feet. 

10-inch, ' . ■ . . 2,887 ** 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including 
underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $6.15. 

Length of masonry completed, 3,212 feet. 

Masonry was begun in trench June 19, 1896 ; finished Feb. 7, 1897. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 
including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 
completion of work, $10.20. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 20 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to 
this year, see the eighth annual report. 

Excavation. 





Opening No. 1. 


Opening No. 2. 


Opening No. 3. 


Character of opening, . 


Open cut, . 


Open cut, . 


Open cut. 


Date of starting, . 


May 22, 1896, . 


Nov. 17, 1896, . 


Nov. 18, 1896. 


Point of beginning or 
point of continuing 
from last year's work. 


200 feet south-west 
of Church Street. 


400 feet west of 
Readville Street- 


At beginning of sec- 
tion. 


Point of ending, . 


About 400 feet west 
of Readville Street. 


End of section. 


250 feet from begin- 
ning of section. 


Date of finishing, . 


Dec. 18, 1896, . 


Feb. 1, 1897, . 


Dec. 11, 1896. 


Length, .... 

¥■ 

Ordinary progress per 
week. 


976 feet, . 


341 feet, . 


250'feet. 


100 feet, . 


48 feet. 


60 feet. 


Applianceaused, . 


Carson Trench Ma- 
chine. 


Carson Trench Ma- 
chine. 


Carson Trench Ma- 
chine. 


Size of gang ordinarily 
employed. 


30 men, 


30 men, 


25 men. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 35 

A 6-inch centrifugal pump was used between Ellis and Church 
streets, and later at a point 100 feet north of Readville Street. 
Anotlier 0-inch centrifugal pump and a pulsometer were used at 
the beginning of Opening No. 2. The estimated maximum rate of 
pumping in 24 hours was 800,000 gallons. 

Foundation. — The bottom of the trench was excavated in clay 
and gravel to fit the invert of the sewer for a distance of approxi- 
mately 270 feet between Church and Readville streets. 

For 1,100 feet of the section fine running sand was encountered, 
which was excavated to a depth varying from 8 inches to 2 feet 
below grade and refilled with gravel. At all other points the bot- 
tom excavation was in sand and gravel, occasionally mixed with 
clay. 

Difficulties. — For the last 840 feet of the section the bottom 
excavation was in fine running sand. The street settled some, 
breaking a gas pipe near the excavation. At a point about 130 
feet from the end of the section the underdrain became clogged 
with the fine sand. A pump well was excavated near this place, 
which caused the street to settle about 6 feet. Thirty-four feet 
of underdrain and concrete invert put in near this point were 
abandoned. For a distance of 160 feet the sewer was raised 2 J 
feet, passing this area of very fine wet sand ; this was made possi- 
ble by moving the location of a step man-hole. Through the low- 
level trench in running sand the concrete invert was built of 
Portland cement, and in the high-level trench through the same 
formation the thickness of the American concrete was increased 
2 inches. 

Miscellaneous. — A slight change was made in the centre line 
for the last 100 feet of the section, where the trench had moved 
considerably. 

Surplus Material. — Much of the surplus material from the 
excavations has been used in filling low lands adjacent to the sewer 
line ; some sand and gravel was used in concrete. 

Section 21 (Neponset Valley System), Hyde Park and 

Dedham. 

Location. — From a point in River Street, Hyde Park, about 25 feet east of Atherton 
Street, extending westerly through public and private lands along the 
northerly bank of Mother Brook to a point in Dedham about 1,000 
feet west of the town line between Hyde Park and Dedham. 

Diameter and length of sewer : — 
4 feet by 4 feet 1 inch, 3,599 feet. 

Contractors. — Mathers & Sullivan of Washington, D. C. The work was superin- 
tended by Mr. E. A. Mathers, a member of the firm. 
Contractors' Principal Foremen. — Richard Morrlsey, William Sullivan. 



36 METKOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan, 



State Assistants.^ 

Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson. 

Inspector : H. M. Woodward. 

Transitmen : Principal (in charge of lines and grades) — J. L. Brown. 

Principal (in charge of records) —Geo. F. Chase. 

Assistant— A. B. Cleaveland, F. W. Crispin. 



Trench. 



4 Feet by 4 Feet 
1 Inch Sewer. 

3,599.00 

12.50 

19.50 

6.70 

6.50 

2.90 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 
Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), 
Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), 

Average width, top of trench (feet) 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards) , . 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left in, 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, $3.30. 
Character of Excavation. — For the first 150 feet of the section about 6 inches of 
gravel, street surfacing, sand, gravel and clay to about water line ; fine wet sand below. 
Then, for a distance of about 300 feet, 1^ feet loam, 2 feet sand and gravel, fine wet 
sand below ; for the next 1,100 feet, 1 foot loam, sand and gravel below ; for the next 
300 feet, ledge starts from about water line and runs to within a foot of surface, then 
drops back to grade ; sand and gravel above ledge ; beyond ledge, about 1 foot of 
loam, fine sand to grade. 

Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . $10 35 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 11 50 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 5 75 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 6 75 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch, 423 feet. 

8-inch, 1,636 " 

10-inch, 1,531 " 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including 
underdrain, tarred paper, etc , to completion of work, $5.70. 

Length of masonry completed (trench), 3,599 feet. 

Masonry begun in trench July 27, 1896 ; finished May 2, 1897. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 

including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 

completion of work, $9.20. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 21 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to this 
year, see the eighth annual report. 

* The above-named State assistants have been employed for a part of the time only on 
Section 21. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45, 



37 



Excavation. 



Opening No. 1. 



Opening No. 2. 



Character of opening, 

Date of starting, 

Point of beginning or point of 
continuing from last year'e 
work, 

Point of ending, 
Date of tinisbing, 

Length, 

Ordinary progress per week, . 
Appliances used. 

Size of gang ordinarily em- 
ployed, 



Open cut, 
July 7, 1896, 



About the middle of Fair 

view Cemetery. 
End of section, 
Nov. 23, 1896, 

1,472 feet 

200 feet 

Steam drills used on ledge; 

hand labor otherwise. 



Open cut. 
April 7, 1897. 



begin- 



100 men, 



About 150 feet from 

nlng of section. 
At the beginning of section. 
April 23, 1897. 
148 feet. 
75 feet. 
Iland labor. 



20 men. 



The ground-water was raised by a 6-inch centrifugal pump near 
the beginning of the section, a 6-inch Worthington pump near 
the middle and a 2-inch Worthington pump at the end of the 
section. Hand-pumps were occasionally used. The estimated 
maximum rate of pumping in 24 hours was 800,000 gallons. 

Shid-chicn. — Work was suspended from Dec. 20, 1896, to 
April 7, 1807, to avoid extra expense of construction during the 
winter. 

Foundation. — At several points on the section fine wet sand 
was found. This was excavated from 3 to 8 inches below grade 
and replaced with gravel. The bottom excavation at all other 
points was in sand, gravel and ledge. A concrete invert has been 
built throughout the section. 

Accident. — On Tuesday, Nov. 24, 1896, a staging fell, causing 
slight injuries to five men ; Edward Truedell, a mason employed 
on the work, had several ribs fractured. 

Miscellaneous. — The sewer line was slightly changed near the 
beginning of the section to make a suitable connection with Sec- 
tion 20. 

Sui-plus Material. — Much of the sand and gravel was used in 
concrete ; the remainder was levelled within the lines of taking. 



Section 22 (Neponset Valley System), Dedham. 

Locatio7i. — From a point in Dedham about 1,000 feet west of the town line between 
Dedham and Hyde Park, extending in a north-westerly direction 
along the bank of Mother Brook, to a point about 550 feet nortb-west 
of Mill Lane. 
Diameter and length of sewer : — 

4 feet by 4 feet 1 inch, 2,404 feet. 

Con^mc^ors. — Mathers & Sullivan of Washington, D. C. The work was superin- 
tended by Mr. E. A. Mathers, a member of this firm. 
Contractors' Principal Foreman. — William Sullivan. 



38 METEOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. . [Jan. 

State Assistants * 
Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson. 
Inspector : H. M. Woodward. 
Transitmen : Principal (in charge of lines and grades) — J. L. Brown. 

Principal (in charge of records) — Geo. F. Chase. 

Assistant — A. B. Cleaveland, F. W. Crispin, B. W. Torrey. 



Trench. 



4 Feet by 4 Feet 
1 Inch Sewer. 

2,404.00 

15.20 

24.00 

11.00 

5.70 

5.00 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 
Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 
Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards). 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left in, 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, $9.35. 

Character of Excavation. — At the beginning of the section, about 1 foot loam, sand 
and gravel to grade ; this same formation existed from a point about 240 feet east 
of Norfolk Mills Dam to about 80 feet east of it; also for a length of about 40 feet 
towards the end of the section. The remainder of the section has been in ledge, run- 
ning from water line to 17 feet above, overlaid with sand and gravel. 

Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard. 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 
Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

4-inch, 

6-inch, 

8-inch, 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including un- 
derdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $5.50. 

Length of masonry completed, 

Masonry begun in trench Aug. 6, 1896 ; finished June 26, 1897. 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry. 
Including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 
completion of work, $15.50. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 22 following this note relates solely 
to the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to 
this year, see the eighth annual report. 

Excavation. 

Character of opening, Open cut. 

Date of starting, July 13, 1896. 

Points of continuing from last year's work, About 400 feet west of Norfolk Mills Dam and 

about 500 feet east of it. 

Points of ending, Beginning and end of section. 

Date of finishing, June 24, 1897. 

Length 1,484 feet. 

Ordinary progress per week, ... .60 feet. 

Appliances used Steam drills, derricks and hand labor- 
Size of gang ordinarily employed, . . .65 men. 

* The above-named State assistants have been employed for part of the time only od 
Section 22. 



. $10 35 


11 50 


5 75 


6 75 


123 feet. 


1,938 «' 


278 " 


2,404 feet. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 39 

A 6-inch and a 2-inch Worthington pump have been used in 
pumping the ground-water. The estimated maximum rate of pump- 
ing in 24 hours was GOO, 000 gallons. 

Shut-down. — Operations on this section were suspended from 
December 23 to March 2G, to avoid extreme cold weather. 

Foundation. — The bottom excavation for this section has been 
in rock, excepting 100 feet at the beginning and 40 feet at the end, 
where sand and gravel were found. A concrete invert has been 
used throughout the section. 

Difficulties. — Some ditficulty was experienced in handling water 
from the Norfolk 3Iills Pond, the level of w^hich had been raised 
by the construction of a new dam. The water followed the back- 
filling above the dam. 

Accident. — John Conly, a brick-mason employed on the work, 
had ribs and collar-bone fractured by rock from a blast. 

Surj:)lus Material. — Much of the surplus material has been 
spread within the taking lines and the remainder carted away. 

Section 23 (Neponset Valley System), Dedham. 

Location. — From a point on the northerly bank of Mother Brook, 550 feet north- 
west of Mill Lane, extending north-westerly through public and pri- 
vate lands along Mother Brook to a point in Colburn Street about 40 
feet south-easterly of Maverick Street. 

Diameter and length of sewer : — 
4 feet by 4 feet 1 inch, 2,596 feet. 

Contractors.— Haskin & Murphy of Charlestown, Mass. 

Contractors' Superintendent. — Thomas H. Murphy, a member of the above-mentioned 
firm. 

Contractors' Principal Foremen. — Martin McLauthlin, Henry Burke, John Clark. 

State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer: Seth Peterson. 

Inspectors: George F. Greenlaw, Caleb Kimball, J. E. Savage, Chris Rasmussen, 

John Craib. 
Transitmen : Principal (in charge of lines and grades) — J. L. Brown. 

Principal (in charge of records) — Geo. F. Chase. 

Assistant — A. B. Cleaveland, F. W. Crispin, B. W. Torrey. 

Trench and Tunnel. \ 

4 Feet by 4 Feet 
1 Inch Sewer. 

Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . . 868.00 

Length of tunnel excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . . 1,728.00 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 14.50 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 17.60 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 9.80 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 6.00 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel excavation 

(feet) 24.00 

* The above-named State assistants have been employed for part of the time only on 
Section 23. 



40 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



4 Feet by 4 Feet 
1 Inch Sewer. 
Greatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel excavation 

(feet), 29.00 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet), 6.50 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . . 4.20 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . 1.80 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, Including sheeting left in, 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, $10.41. 
Approximate cost of tunnel excavation per linear foot, including 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, $10. 

Character of Excavation. — For the first 450 feet the excavation was in rock ; from 
this point the rock ran downwards and disappeared in about 100 feet, the material 
being 8 inches loam, then sand and gravel to grade for the next 250 feet ; then rock 
again appeared and ran to a height of 7 or 8 feet above water line, with sand and 
gravel above for about 70 feet. The remainder of the section was in tunnel, and the 
formation consisted of rock except for about 150 feet in Bussey Street, where it con- 
sisted of sand, gravel and boulders. 



. $12 00 


14 00 


13 00 


15 00 


. . 5 00 


6 00 


7 50 


8 50 


1,600 feet. 


685 " 


302 «♦ 



Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 
Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), 
Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel). 
Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), . 
Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . 
Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench) , . 
Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . 
Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (trench), . 
Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard (tunnel), . 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

4-inch, 

6-inch, 

8-inch, 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including un- 
derdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $5.40. 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of tunnel, including un- 
derdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $6.20. 

Length of masonry completed (trench), 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 

Masonry was begun in trench April 24, 1897; finished Sept. 1, 1897. 
Masonry was begun in tunnel Nov. 13, 1896; finished July 23, 1897. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 
including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 
completion of work, $16.60. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 23 following this note relates solely 
to the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to 
this year, see the eighth annual report. 



868 feet. 
1,728* " 



* A portion of this tunnel work was paid for at trench rates. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



41 



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42 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

The ground-water was handled by a 6-inch Worthington pump 
used at different points on the section ; a 2-inch pump and a 
pulsometer were also occasionally used. The estimated maximum 
rate of pumping in 24 hours was 400,000 gallons. 

Shut-down, — The work on the shaft at the corner of Colburn 
and Curve streets was suspended for about three weeks because of 
flooding. 

Foundation. — The bottom excavation was in rock, excepting 
for 250 feet east of Colburn Street and 100 feet under Bussey 
Street, where sand and gravel were found. 

A concrete invert has been used throughout the section. 

Difficulties, — At the corner of Colburn and Curve streets con- 
siderable water was found. The roof of the tunnel caved in, which 
necessitated retimbering. At the next shaft, on Bussey Street, the 
water from the mill-pond came freely through the street filling. 
After working a month the shaft was abandoned. A new one was 
opened at a point 150 feet north and the sewer line moved farther 
away from the pond. When the heading reached a point about 
opposite the abandoned shaft it became flooded. Excavation from 
the surface was then made for a short length between the tunnel 
and the pond, and back-filled with fine material, which practically 
shut off the pond water. The water in the pond was drawn down 
on a Sunday to facilitate operations. Through this very wet area 
the sewer arch was reinforced. 

Surplus Material. — Most of the surplus rock has been crushed 
and used in concrete ; some has been sold and the remainder 
levelled off within the lines of taking. 

Section 24 (Neponset Valley System), Dedham. 

Location. — From a point in Colburn Street, about 40 feet south-east of Maverick 
Street, extending north-westerly through private land along the 
northerly bank of Mother Brook to Curve Street. 
Diameters of sewers and length of each size : — 

4 feet by 4 feet 1 inch, 81 feet. 

3 feet 9 inches by 3 feet 10 inches 2,384 " 

Contractors. — Haskin & Murphy of Charlestown, Mass. 

Contractors' Superintendent. — Thomas H. Murphy, a member of the above-men- 
tioned firm. 
Contractors'' Principal Foremen. — Tunnel : Martin McLaughlin, Henry Burke; 
open cut : John McLauthlin. 

State Assistants.* 
Assistant Engineer: Seth Peterson. 
Inspectors : George F. Greenlaw, Caleb Kimball, J. E. Savage, John Craib, J. D. 

Collins. 
Transitmen : Principal (in charge of lines and grades) —George S. Miller. 
Principal (in charge of records) — George F. Chase. 
Assistant — J. T. P. Jones, Eugene Russ, R. D. Greenlaw. 

* The above-named State assistants have been employed for a part of the time only on 
jgection 24. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



43 



Trench and Tunnel. 



4 Feet 

by 4 Feet 

llnch 

Sewer. 



3 Feet 9 
Inches by 

3 Feet 
10 Inches 

Sewer. 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 

Length of tunnel excavated to bottomof underdrain (feet), . 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 

Greatest depth of trenrh excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), 

Average widtli, top of trench (feet) 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 

Average depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel exca- 
vation (feut) 

Qreatest depth from surface of ground to bottom of tunnel exca- 
vation (feel), 

Average width of tunnel excavation (feet), 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Volume of tunnel excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Approximate cost of trench and tunnel per linear foot, including 
sheeting left in, excavation and refilling below masonry, back- 
tilling, etc., to completion of work, 




$12 25 



Character of Excavation. — The first 1,050 feet of the section were excavated entirely 
through rock ; this was followed for 1,070 feet by 1 foot loam, then sand, gravel and 
clay to rock, which ran from bottom to 14 feet above; and for the remainder of the 
section, 1 foot loam, then sand and gravel to grade. 



Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . $12 50 
Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 14 00 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 5 50 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 6 90 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

4-inch, 1,050 feet. 

6-inch, 155 «' 

8-inch, 1,017 " 

r2-incli, 243 <« 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench and tunnel, in- 
cluding underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, 
$0.60. 

Length of masonry completed (trench) 1,050 feet. 

Length of masonry completed (tunnel), 1415 ** 

Masonry begun in trench Nov. 4, 1896; finished Sept. 26, 1897. 
Masonry begun in tunnel Nov. 25, 1896 ; finished Sept. 29, 1897. 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 

including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 

completion of work, $18.85. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 24 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to this 
year, see the eighth annual report. 



44 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Excavation. 





Opening No. 1. 


Opening No. 2. 


Opening No. 3. 


Character of opening, 


Tunnel, 


Tunnel, 


Open cut. 


Number of tunnel 
headings, 


Two 


Two, .... 


- 


Date of starting. 


July 13, 1896, . 


July 20, 1896, . 


Aug. 3, 1896. 


Points of continuing 
from last year's 
work, 


Westerly line of Mav- 
erick Btreet and 287 
feet westerly there- 
from. 


At points 300 feet and 
600 feet westerly 
from Maverick Street. 


About 1,250 feet 
westerly from 
Maverick Street. 


Points of ending, 


Beginning of section 
and 423 feet from 
beginning. 


About 423 feet from 
beginning of section 
and 1,050 feet from 
same. 


End of section. 


Date of finishing. 


Oct. 30, 1896, 


Dec. 28, 1896, 


Sept. 18, 1897. 


Length, 


136 feet, 


312 feet. 


1,345 feet. 


Ordinary progress 
per week, 


40 feet. 


30 feet,. 


30 feet. 


Appliances used, 


Elevators and cars, . 


Drills run by com- 
pressed air. 


Travelling derrick 
and cable-way. 


Size of gang ordina- 
rily employed, 


10 men, 


13 men. 


25 men. 



The ground-water was handled as follows : at shaft No. 1 by a 
2-inch steam pump ; at shaft No. 2 by a pulsometer, which was 
afterwards replaced by a 4-inch steam pump ; and in the open-cut 
work by a 6-inch centrifugal and a 5-inch steam pump. The 
estimated greatest rate of pumping in 24 hours was 1,000,000 
gallons. 

Shut-down. — A shut-down occurred on shaft No. 2 from Feb. 
1 to June 3, 1897, on account of bad weather and lack of neces- 
sary machinery for working the section. 

Foundation. — The bottom excavation has been rock except for 
about 380 feet at the end of the section, which was in sand and 
gravel. An invert of concrete was used throughout the section. 

Miscellaneous. — The sewer line as it entered Curve Street was 
moved about 4 J feet, to avoid trees. 



Section 25 (Neponset Valley System), Dedham. 

Location. — From a point in Curve Street, about 430 feet east of Washington Street, 
extending north-westerly through public and private land to a point 
about 100 feet north-west of the Dedham branch of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 

Diameter and length of sewer : — 
3 feet 9 inches by 3 feet 10 inches 2,666 feet. 

Contractor. — E. "W. Everson of Providence, R. I. 
Contractor's Superintendent and Foreman. — Geo. "W. Upper. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 45 



State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson. 
Inspector : Charles Roesbeck. 

Transitmen : Principal (in charge of lines and grades) — George S.Miller, S. G. 

Packard. 

Principal (in charge of records) — Geo. F. Chase. 

Assistant — J. T. P. Jones, Eugene Russ. 



Trench. 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), 



3 Feet 9 Inches by 

3 Feet 10 Inche» 

Sewer. 

2,666.00 



Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 20.50 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), . 24.50 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 8.00 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 6.00 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . . 5.30 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left in, 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to com- 
pletion of work, S8.10. 
Character of Excavation. — At beginning of section, 8 inches gravel street surfac- 
ing, 2i feet loam, gravel and sand below ; 40 feet east of Washington Street, 8 inches 
surfacing, 2^ feet loam, sand and fine gravel to grade ; 200 feet west of "Washington 
Street, 8 inches surfacing, 2^ feet loam, gravel and sand to arch, fine wet sand to grade. 
From Centre Street for the next 800 feet, 1 foot loam, sand and gravel to grade ; 100 
feet farther on, 5 feet peat, sand (fine and wet) to grade. This sand runs out in 
about 150 feet, and for the next 550 feet there are about 6 feet of peat with clayey 
gravel below. From this point ledge is found in the bottom and rises to a height of 
12 feet above water line. The ledge continues at an average height of about 10 feet 
to within about 60 feet of the end of the section. The material above the ledge is 
clay, sand and gravel. 

Masonry. 
Contract prices: — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch, 

10-inch, 

12-inch, 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including un- 
derdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work, $5.90. 

Length of masonry completed (trench) , 2,666 feet. 

Masonry begun in trench Aug. 26, 1896 ; finished April 7, 1897. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 
including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 
completion of work, $14.25. 

Note. — The information regarding Section 25 following this note relates solely to 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1897. For a description of the work performed prior to this 
year, see the eighth annual report. 



$11 50 


13 50 


5 00 


6 00 


270 feet. 


1,110 « 


1,310 " 



* The above-named State aBsistants have been employed for part of the time only on 
Bectioo 25. 



46 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 



Excavation. 

Character of opening, Open cut. 

Date of starting, July 27, 1896. 

Point of continuing from last year's work, Curve Street, about 50 feet east of Centre Street. 
Point of ending, At a point about 100 feet north-west of the Ded- 

ham branch of the New York, New Haven & 

Hartford Raihoad. 

Date of finishing March 29, 1897. 

Length, 2,016 feet. 

Ordinary progress per week, . . . 125 feet. 

Appliances used, Brown Excavator. 

Size of gang ordinarily employed, . . 45 men. 

The ground-water was raised by an 8-inch centrifugal pump 
located about 150 feet west of Centre Street. This pump was 
also used at a point about 800 feet west of its original location, 
and later at a point 200 feet east of^^the railroad. In addition to 
the foregoing, a 4-inch centrifugal and a No. 5 pulsometer were 
temporarily used. The estimated maximum rate of pumping in 24 
hours was 1,500,000 gallons. 

Delay. — Operations were suspended for about two weeks in 
February, owing to bad weather and high water of the Charles 
River. 

Foundation. — Beginning at a point about 800 feet west of 
Centre Street, it was found best to excavate to a depth of about 
1 foot below the bottom of the masonry, for a distance of about 
35 feet, and refill with gravel. For the greater part of the section 
the bottom of the excavation consisted of sand, gravel, clay and 
ledge, the concrete being placed directly upon such formations ex- 
cept for a distance of about 48 feet near the end of the section, 
where a cradle, consisting of ribs 2 by 6 inches, placed 4 feet 
apart and lined with two thicknesses of 1-inch boards with tar 
paper between, was used. 

Difficulties. — For a length of 200 feet in marsh, where a con- 
siderable depth of peat was found overlaying sand, great difficulty 
was experienced in bracing the trench and keeping it in line. 

Under the railroad tracks the sewer arch was reinforced with 
concrete to a depth of 6 inches. 

To tighten the sewer a plaster of Portland cement f inch in 
thickness was applied between the neat and rough work of the 
arch. 

Surplus Material. — A considerable portion of the surplus earth 
from the excavations was used in the construction of roads to 
facilitate the transportation of materials to the sewer trench, and 
in filling low lands in the vicinity. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



47 



Section 26 (Neponset Valley System), Dedham and West 

ROXBURY. 

Location. — From a point in Dedham about 1,500 feet northerly from Mother Brook 
and about 100 feet north-westerly from the Dedham branch of the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, extending through 
private and marsh lands, near the Charles River, to Spring Street, 
West Roxbury. 

Diameters and lengths of sewer : — 

2 feet 10 inches by 2 feet 11 inches, 1,824 feet. 

3 feet 9 inches by 3 feet 10 inches 2,246 *' 

Contractors. — T^^AtionAl Contracting Company of New York, N. Y. 
Contractors' Superintendents. — Mark Wilmarth, Geo. P. Griffith, Jr. 
Contractors' Principal Foreman. — William Lindsay. 

State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer : C. Barton Pratt. 

Inspectors : Chris Rasmussen, George F. Greenlaw. 

Transitmen: Principal — G. E. Stratton. 

Assistant — M. F. Sanborn, Walter Cleary, William Hobbs. 

Trench. 



2 Feet 10 
Inches by 

2 Feet 
11 Inches 

Sewer. 



3 Feet 9 
Inches by 

3 Feel 
10 Inches 

Sewer. 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdraln (feet), . 

Average depthof trench excavution to bottom of underdrain (feet), 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 

Average width, top of trench (feet) 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left 
in, excavation and refilling below masonry, back-tilling, etc., 
to date (Sept. 30, 1897) 



666.00 

15.00 

15.00 

6.80 

5.50 

3.40 

$3 24 



520.00 

17.30 

18.00 

8.00 

6.70 

4.70 

$7 67 



Character of Excavation. — From the beginning of the section near the Dedham 
branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, and for a distance of 
260 feet, the formation consisted of 5 feet peat, then sand and clay to grade. About 
1,986 feet from the beginning of the section, all peat for a distance of 219 feet. About 
2,205 feet from the beginning of the section, peat from 16 to 11 feet deep, then fine 
sand and clay to grade. This last formation extended for a distance of 345 feet. 
About 2,550 feet from the beginning of the section, peat from 11 to 7 feet in depth, 
then 3 feet fine sand, gravel and clay, then gravel to grade, the formation extending 
for a distance of 100 feet. About 2,650 feet from the beginning of section, and near 
the southerly entrance to Caledonian Grove, peat from 3 to 7 feet in depth, on top of 
gravel and boulders, the formation extending for 162 feet. 

* The above-named State assistants, except Mr. Chris Kasmussen, have been employed for 
part of the time only on Section 26. 



48 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . $11 45 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 13 45 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 4 90 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 6 50 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch by 8-inch box drain, 28 feet. 

8-inch, 38 <* 

10-inch, 688 ♦* 

12-inch, 126] « 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including under- 
drain, tarred paper, etc., to Sept. 30, 1897 : — 

2 feet 10 inches by 2 feet 11 inches sewer, $4 22 

3 feet 9 inches by 3 feet 10 inches sewer, 5 67 

Length of masonry completed : — 

2 feet 10 inches by 2 feet 11 inches sewer, 544 feet. 

3 feet 9 inches by 3 feet 10 inches sewer, 363 " 

Masonry was begun in trench July 19, 1897, and is now.in progress. 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 

including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to Sept. 

30, 1897, $12,05. 

Excavation. 





Opening No. 1. 


Opening No. 2. 


Character of opening, 


Open cut 


Open cut. 


Date of starting, . 


June 24, 1897 


Aug. 4, 1897. 


Point of beginning, 


About 2,800 feet from begin- 
ning of section in marsh 
and near road leading to 
the south end of Caledonian 
Grove, working down grade 
of sewer. 


At the lower end of section, 
about 100 feet north-westerly 
from the Dedham branch of 
the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad, and 
about 1,500 feet northerly 
from Mother Brook, working 
up grade of sewer. 


Point where work was in 
progress Sept. 30, 1897, . 


About 2,000 feet from the 
beginning of section and 
about 800 feet south of the 
southerly entrance to Cale- 
donian Grove. 


About 270 feet from beginning 
of section. 


Length 


816 feet, 


270 feet. 


Ordinary progress per week, 


72 feet 


48 feet. 


Appliances used, 


Carson Trench Machine, 


Carson Trench Machine. 


Size of gang ordinarily em- 
ployed 


60 men, .... 


60 men. 



The ground-water was raised by a 6-inch centrifugal pump 
located at a well about 45 feet from the beginning of the section, 
near the Dedham branch of the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad, the estimated greatest rate of pumping in 24 hours 
being 280,000 gallons ; and by a 6-inch centrifugal pump located 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 49 

fit a well about 2,700 feet from the beginning of the section and 
100 feet south of the southerly entrance to Caledonian Grove ; the 
estimated rate of pumping in 24 hours being 350,000 gallons. 

Foundation. — It was necessary to excavate below the bottom 
of the masonry to a depth of about 15 inches and refill with dif- 
ferent material for all of the section completed to date, with the 
exception of about 157 feet of pile section and about 172 feet of 
cradle section near the southerly entrance to Caledonian Grove. 
The material removed below grade has consisted of peat, fine sand 
and clay, and the refilling of bank and screened gravel. 

A pile foundation was driven for a length of approximately 157 
feet, beginning at a point about 600 feet south of the southerly 
road to Caledonian Grove, in marsh land adjacent to the Charles 
River, the piles varying in length from 15 to 44 feet. A peaty 
formation existed where this pile foundation was driven. 

Where cradling was used near the southerly entrance to Cale- 
donian Grove, the formation at the bottom of the trench con- 
sisted of sand and gravel. Inside the cradle a full 8-inch section 
was built. 

AVhere piling or cradling was not used the trench was excavated 
about 2 feet below sewer grade and refilled. On this a concrete 
invert was built, giving about G inches of concrete in the bottom 
and G to 8 inches on the sides of the brick masonry. A 4-inch 
Portland brick invert was laid in the concrete ; an 8-inch arch of 
American brick masonry was used, with | inch of Portland cement 
plaster. 



•Section 27 (Neponset Valley System), West Roxbury. 

Location. — From a point in Spring Street, West Roxbury, near the easterly bank 
of the Charles River, extending north-westerly through private and 
marsh lands near the Charles River to Gardner Street, and in Gardner 
Street for about 500 feet. 

Diameter and length of sewer : — 
2 feet 10 inches by 2 feet 11 inches, 3,457.7 feet. 

Con^mc^or. — National Contracting Company of New York, N. Y. 

Contractor's Superintendents. — M.a.rk Wilmarth, Geo. P. Griffith, Jr. 

Contractor's Principal Foreman. — William Lindsay. 

State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer: C. Barton Pratt. 

Inspectors : Caleb Kimball, John Collins, John E. Savage. 

Transitmen : Principal — G. E. Stratton. 

Assistant — M. F. Sanborn, Walter Cleary, William Hobbs. 



♦ The above-named State aseietantB, except Mr. Caleb Kimball, have been employed for a 
part of the time only on Section 27. 



50 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Trench. 



2 Feet 10 Inches by 

2 Feet 11 Inches 

Sewer. 

1,847.00 

12.00 

13.00 

7.10 

6.10 

3 00 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of underdrain (feet), 
Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), 
Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards) , . 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting"^Ieft in 
excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to Sept 
30, 1897, 15.22. 

Character of Excavation. — From a point about 150 feet from Spring Street in Open- 
ing No. 2, the excavation was in from 2^ to 12 feet of peat, with'coarse sand to grade 
for a distance of 452 feet. From the beginning of Opening No. 1, about 1,100 feet from 
Spring Street, the excavation was in from 2 to 5 feet of peat, 2 to 5 feet sand and 
gravel, then fine sand and clay to grade, this formation extending for a distance 
of about 435 feet. Then the excavation was through 8 feet of peat, followed by fine 
sand and gravel to grade for 100 feet. Then for a distance of 370 feet, the entire 
formation through which the excavation ran consisted of peat. Then for a distance 
of 490 feet, 8 feet peat, then coarse sand to grade. 



Masonry, 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

8-inch, 

8-inch by 10-inch wood, 

10-inch, 

12-inch, 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including 
underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to Sept. 30, 1897, $4.61. 

Length of masonry completed, 

Masonry was begun in trench June 29, 1897, and is now (Sept. 30, 

1897) in progress. 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 

including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 

Sept. 30, 1897, $10.27. 

Excavation. 



. $11 45 

13 45 

4 90 

6 50 

182 feet. 
277 " 
1,336 *' 
32 " 



1,744 feet. 





Opening No. 1. 


Opening No. 2. 


Character of opening, . 


Open cut, 


Open cut. ^ 


Date of starting, . 


June 10, 1897, .... 


Aug. 28, 1897. 


Point of beginning, 


Near Charles River and about 


Near Charles River and about 




1,100 feet north-east from 


50 feet northeast from Spring 




Spring Street in Parental 


Street in Parental School 




School groutulis. 


grounds. 


Point where work was in 






progress Sept. 30, 1897, . 


About 2,500 feet from Spring 


About 500 feet from Spring 




Street, near the easterly 


Street, in private land near 




bank, Charles River, in pri- 


easterly bank, Charles River, 




vate land. 


in Parental School grounds. 


Length, .... 


1,379 feet, 


524 feet. 


Ordinary progress per 






week, .... 


For the first 700 feet, about 48 
feet; for the next 600 feet, 
about 144 feet. 


144 feet. 


Appliances used. 


Carson Trench Machine, 


Carson Trench Machine. 


Size of gang ordinarily em- 






ployed, .... 


60 men, 


60 men. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 45. 51 

The ground-water on this section has been disposed of as fol- 
lows : — 

A 6-inch centrifugal pump was used at a well about 100 feet 
north-westerly from Spring Street, in the Parental School grounds ; 
estimated maximum rate of pumping in 24 hours, 300,000 gallons. 

A 4-inch pulsometer was used at a well located about 1,200 feet 
north-westerly from Spring Street, in the Parental School grounds ; 
estimated maximum rate of pumping in 24 hours, 100,000 gallons. 

An 8-incli centrifugal pump was used at a well about 1,600 feet 
from Spring Street and about 125 feet from the easterly bank of 
the Charles River ; estimated maximum rate of pumping in 24 
hours, 500,000 gallons. 

Foundation. — It was found necessary to excavate below the 
bottom of the masonry and refill with screened gravel, to a depth 
of about 2 feet, for 105 feet up grade from a point 225 feet from 
the beginning of the section ; for 300 feet up grade from a point 
1,940 feet from the beginning of the section; and for a distance 
of 500 feet up grade from a point 1,100 feet from the beginning of 
the section. The bottom excavation was in fine sand and clay. 

A pile foundation was built for a distance of 258 feet from a 
point in private land, near the Charles River, and about 1,600 
feet northerly from Spring Street. The piles varied in length 
from 10 to 33 feet. Tlie formation where piling was used con- 
sisted principally of peat. 

Difficulties — The trench was flooded at a point about 1,660 feet 
from Spring Street, where the trench approached near to the 
Charles River. AVater having found its way from the river to the 
trench tln-ough holes in the peat, 6 or 7 feet below the surface of 
the marsh, 3-inch sheet piling was driven between the trench and 
the river for a short distance at this point. 

On Opening No. 1 the vertical diameter of the sewer was in- 
creased 4 inches for a distance of 1,141 feet. 

Surplus Material. — Considerable of the surplus earth has been 
used to fill low areas in a portion of the Parental School grounds. 

Section 28 (Neponset Valley System), West Roxbury. ' 

Location. — From a point in West Roxbury, about 5 feet north-east of Gardner Street 
and about 150 feet north-west of the raih-oad siding leading to the ice- 
houses of the Highland Ice Company, extending north-easterly through 
private lands to Baker Street. 
Diameters of sewers and length of each size : — 

2 feet 8 inches, 3,346.58 feet. 

2 feet 2 inches, 1,220.44 " 

Contractors. — YoMon and Holbrook, Cabot & Daly of Boston, Mass. 
The work was superintended by members of the firm. 



52 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



State Assistants.* 
Assistant Engineer : C. Barton Pratt. 

Inspectors : Cornelius J. Regan, H. M. "Woodward, John D. Collins. 
Transitmen : Principal — J. L. Brown. 

Assistant — Walter Cleary, A. B. Cleaveland, William Hobbs. 

Trench and Tunnel. 



2 Feet 8 
Inches 
Sewer. 



2 Feet 2 

Inches 

Sewer. 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of tinderdrain (feet), . 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet) , 

Greatest depth of trench excavation to bottom of underdrain (feet), 

Average width, top of trench (feet) 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet) 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic yards), . 

Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, including sheeting left 
in, excavation and refilling below masonry, back-filling, etc., to 
Sept. 30, 1897 



3,346.58 

10.00 

14.50 

5.30 

5.10 

1.90 

$2 92 



1,220.44 
6.70 
11.00 
4.40 
4.40 
1.00 

$1 76 



Character of Excavation. — From the beginning of the section at Gardner Street 
and for a distance of about 1,100 feet the excavation was through about 1 foot loam, 
4 feet sand and gravel, then fine sand and some clay to grade. For the next 700 feet, 
peat averaging 7 feet in depth, then sand to grade. For 300 feet from this point, 4 
feet peat, 2 feet Avhite sand, then sand and gravel to grade. For the next 550 feet, 
about 10 feet peat, then fine sand and clay to grade. For 700 feet, about 7 feet peat, 
then clay, sand and gravel to grade. For 850 feet, from 2 to 4 feet black peat, then 
clay, sand and gravel to grade. Then for the next 367 feet to the end of the section 
at Baker Street, 1^ feet loam and peat, then coarse gravel, sand and clay to grade. 

Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... $12 75 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 13 50 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, ' 5 75 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 7 75 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch, 1,643 feet. 

8-inch, 2,199 '* 

10-inch, 745 *' 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including 
underdrain, tarred paper, etc., to Sept. 30, 1897 : — 

2 feet 8 inches sewer, $4 22 

2 feet 2 inches sewer, 2 11 

Length of masonry completed : — 

2 feet 8 inches sewer, 3,346.58 feet. 

2 feet 2 inches sewer, 1,220.44 " 

Masonry begun in trench June 29, 1897 ; finished Sept. 28, 1897. 
Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 
including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 
completion of work, $6.46. 

* The above-named State assistants, with the exception of H. M. Woodward, have been 
employed for part of the time only on Section 28. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



53 



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54 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

A number of wells were sunk on this section for handling the 
ground-water, located as follows: 25 feet, 700 feet, 1,030 feet, 
1,320 feet, 1,735 feet, 3,317 feet, 4,000 feet and 4,300 feet from 
the beginning of the section. Six-inch centrifugal pumps were 
generally used. A 4-inch pulsometer was used at the well 3,317 
feet from the beginning of the section, and at the one in private 
land 4,300 feet from the beginning of the section. In the last- 
named well hand pumps were also used. 

Foundation. — For a distance of 3,100 feet from the beginning 
of the section it was necessary to excavate to a depth of 14 inches 
below the bottom of the masonry and refill with different material. 
For 2,250 feet the formation removed consisted of fine sand mixed 
with some clay and gravel ; for 300 feet, peat ; and for 250 feet, 
fine sand. 

Miscellaneous. — From Gardner Street for a distance of 1,735 
feet easterly the sewer line was moved about 6 feet from its origi- 
nal location, in order to clear as much as possible the pipes of the 
Brookline Water Works, which run parallel with the sewer. 

Surplus Material, — The surplus material from the excavation 
has been used for banking man-holes ; the remainder has been 
spread over the trench within the lines of taking. 



Section 29 (Neponset Valley System), West Roxbury. 

Location. — From a point in Baker Street, West Roxbury, about 670 feet nortb-west 
of Weld Street, extending througb public and private lands to a point 
in Weld Street about 300 feet north-west of Dwinell Street. 
Diameters of brick sewers and length of each size : — 

2 feet 2 inches, 453.80 feet. 

1 foot 8 inches, 1,947.71 " 

Diameters of pipe sewers and length of each size : — 

1 foot 3 inches, 2,156.37 feet. 

Ifoot 158.24 *' 

Contractor. — Dennis F. O'Connell of Dorchester, Mass. Mr. O'Connell has acted 

as his own superintendent. 
Contractor's Principal Foremen. — Michael Stapleton, Oscar Roesbeck, William 

Fairbanks. 

State Assistants.* 

Assistant Engineer : C. Barton Pratt. 

Inspectors: John Collins, Geo. A. Chase, J. E. Savage, Charles Roesbeck. 
Transitmen : Principal— J. L. Brown, George F. Chase. 
Assistant — F. W. Crispin, William Hobbs. 



* The above-named State assistants, except Mr. George A. Chase and Mr. F. W. Crispin, 
have been employed for a part of the time only on Section 29. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



55 



Trench. 



2 Feet 

2 Inrhes 

Brick 

Sewer. 



1 Foot 

8 Inches 

Brick 

Sewer. 



1 Foot 
3 Inches 

Pipe 
Sewer. 



1 Foot 

Pipe 

Sewer. 



Length of trench excavated to bottom of under- 
drain (feet), 

Average depth of trench excavation to bottom of 
underdruiu (feet), 

GreatcHt depth of trench excavation to bottom of 
underdrain (feet) 

Average width, top of trench (feet), 

Average width, bottom of trench (feet), . 

Volume of trench excavation per linear foot (cubic 
yards), 



Approximate cost of trench per linear foot, in 
eluding nheeting left in, excavation and refilling 
below masonry, back-filliog, etc., to completion 
of work, 



453.80 

13.00 

15.00 
4.00 
4.00 



1.90 



$4 63 



1,947.71 

10.00 

17.00 
3.80 
3.80 

1.40 
$2 09 



2,156.37 

10.50 

18.50 
3.50 
3.50 

1.35 
$2 34 



158.24 

18.50 

17.00 
3.50 
3.50 

2.10 
$3 95 



Character of Excavation. — From the beginning of the section and for a distance of 
200 feet there was a strip of ledge from 1 to 14 feet in depth and covered with loam, 
sand and gravel ; the next 250 feet, hard sand and gravel ; next 950 feet, 1 to 2 feet 
loam, then sand and clay to grade; then for 1,100 feet, 1 foot loam, fine sand, sand 
and gravel, with some places a little clay, to grade ; for the next 500 feet, street surfac- 
ing, then fine sand to grade; then for 1,000 feet, 1 to 3 feet peat, then fine sand to 
grade; next 550 feet, 1 to 2 feet loam, clay and sand to grade; for 166 feet on Weld 
Street, street surfacing, then fine sand and gravel to grade, with a considerable number 
of boulders. 

Masonry. 
Contract prices : — 

Brickwork, American cement mortar, per cubic yard, .... $13 00 

Brickwork, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, . . . . 14 50 

Concrete, American cement mortar, per cubic yard 5 00 

Concrete, Portland cement mortar, per cubic yard, 6 25 

Diameters of underdrain laid and length of each size : — 

6-inch 617 feet. 

8-inch, 3,762 " 

Approximate cost of masonry per linear foot of trench, including un- 
derdrain, tarred paper, etc., to completion of work : — 

2 feet 2 inches brick sewer, $2 17 

1 foot 8 inches brick sewer, 1 74 

1 foot 3 inches pipe sewer, 52 

1 foot pipe sewer, 1 51 

Length of masonry completed, 2,401.51 feet. 

Masonry begun in trench July 2, 1897; finished Sept. 30, 1897. 

Approximate cost of section per linear foot of excavation and masonry, 

including labor, material, inspection and miscellaneous items, to 

completion of work, $3.81. 



56 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



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1898. J PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 57 

The gi'ouncl- water was raised by means of pumps located as 
follows : At well about 450 feet from the beginning of the section, 
No. 6 pulsometer ; estimated greatest rate of pumping in 24 hours, 
125,000 gallons. At well in La Grange Street, about 1,356 feet 
from the beginning of the section, 3-inch horizontal pump; esti- 
mated greatest rate of pumping in 24 hours, 80,000 gallons. At 
well in Weld Street, corner of La Grange Street, hand pump. At 
well on Newfield Street, about 300 feet from Weld Street, No. 
6 pulsometer; estimated greatest rate of pumping in 24 hours, 
100,000 gallons. Three other wells were sunk in private lands, 
2,973 feet, 3,798 feet and 4,510 feet respectively from the begin- 
ning of the section ; at each of these wells hand pumps were 
introduced. 

For the greater portion of the section it was necessary to exca- 
vate below the bottom of the masonry to a depth of from 1 foot to 
li feet and refill with screened gravel, the material removed con- 
sisting of fine sand occasionally mixed with clay. 

The bottom of the trench at points other than as stated above 
has consisted of ledge, sand and gravel ; where such formation has 
existed either cradle or a concrete foundation has been used. 

Miscellaneous. — About 500 feet from the beginning of the sec- 
tion, where the sewer passes through private land, intended at a 
later date to be filled, the arch comes within about 3 feet of the 
surface. 

Surplus Material. — The surplus material has been used in filling 
low areas adjacent to the line of the sewer. 



Neponset River Crossing, Milton Lower Mills. 

Location. — Starting from a man-hole on the Dorchester Intercepting Sewer near the 
junction of Balcer's Court and Washington Street^ Dorchester, extend- 
ing about 60 feet to a man-hole near the abutment of the bridge over 
the Neponset River; thence under, and attached to, the bridge to a 
man-hole near the bridge abutment on the Milton side ; a total dis- 
tance of 20 1 feet. 

Day Work. 
Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson.* 

Character of Structure. — The structure consists of 57 feet of 
8-inch Akron pipe and 144 feet of 8-inch heavy cast-iron water 
pipe. Two man-holes were constructed, one on either side of the 
river, and between these was laid the cast-iron pipe suspended by 
wrought-iron hangers to the floor-girders of the bridge. 

* Employed for a small part of the time only on this work. 



58 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

Progress. — The work was commenced about the first of July 
and was completed about the end of that month. 

Cost. 

Labor and teaming, $283 25 

Cement, pipe, brick, lumber, etc., 216 11 

Miscellaneous expenditures, 20 58 

$519 94 

Neponset River Crossing, Central Avenue. 

Location. — Starting from a man-hole on the Metropolitan Sewer, Section 12, at Cen- 
tral Avenue, extending southerly to the Neponset River; thence 
across the river on the girders of the bridge across the Neponset 
River and under the traclis of the Old Colony system of the New 
Yorl<, New Haven & Hartford Railroad to a point in Central Avenue, 
Milton, about 10 feet southerly from the railroad; a total distance 
of 294 feet. 

Day Work. ' 

Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson.* 

Character of Structure. — The structure consists of about 90 
feet of 15-inch Akron pipe, laid from the man-hole on the Metro- 
politan Sewer to a man-hole just outside the abutment of the Central 
Avenue bridge. . About 204 feet of 16-inch heavy cast-iron pipe, 
laid on angle irons supported on the bottom chords of the bridge 
trusses, connect the latter man-hole with a man-hole on the south- 
erly side of the bridge, at a point about 10 feet south of the 
tracks of the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad. 

Progress. — The work was commenced in the latter part of July 
and was completed about Aug. 25, 1897. 

Cost. 

Labor and teaming, $581 52 

Cement, pipe, brick, lumber, etc., 737 35 

Miscellaneous expenditures, 84 55 



,403 42 



Neponset River Crossing, Mattapan vSquare. 



Location. — Beginning at the point of connection with the Neponset Valley Inter- 
cepting Sewer; thence passing the Matlapan station of the Old Colony 
system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad ; thence 
across and under the river about 30 feet down stream from the bridge 
between Boston and Milton ; thence extending into the town of Milton 
for a distance of about 30 feet; the total distance being about 198 feet. 

Day Work. 

Assistant Engineer : Seth Peterson.* 

* Employed for a email part of the time only on this work. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 59 

Character of Structure. — The structure consists of 96 feet 
under the river of extra-heavy, 20-inch cast-iron pipe, surrounded 
with Portland cement concrete 1 foot in thickness ; and the re- 
mainder of 20-incli Akron pipe, surrounded with American cement 
concrete 6 inches in thickness. Heavily reinforced cast-iron pipe 
was used under the river, as a new bridge is soon to be built, the 
abutments of which may extend over the sewer. 

The underdrain laid consists of 60 feet of 4-inch, 30 feet of 
6-inch and the balance of 8-inch pipe. Two man-holes were con- 
structed, one near the end of the iron pipe on the Milton side and 
one at the junction with the main intercepter. 

Method of Construction and Miscellaneous. — A well was sunk 
near the bank of the river on the Milton side and a 6-inch centrif- 
ugal pump located there. In crossing the river a coffer-dam was 
used, the outer sheeting of which rested on the bed of the stream, 
the inner sheeting being driven as the excavation progressed. 

As the bottom of the river on the Milton side consisted of 
boulders and gravel resting on a bed of ledge, the sheeting could 
not be driven in advance of the digging. This rendered it neces- 
sary to set the outer sheeting of the coffer-dam around a frame of 
timbers and upon the bed of the stream. To prevent any lateral 
sliding which might be caused by the force of the river current, 
iron piles were driven where possible, to which the timbers were 
anchored. 

Width of coffer-dam over all, 10 feet. 

Width of trencli 4 •' 

Width between inner and outer sheeting, . . . . 3 '♦ 

The space between the inner and outer sheeting of the coffer- 
dam was filled with sand and clay from one of the shore trenches. 

While the sewer operations were in progress, quite a strong cur- 
rent existed, the depth of the river at this point being about 5 
feet. It was not deemed advisable to occupy more than one-third 
of the cross-section of the stream at one time. 

The coarse bottom of the river yielded water very freely. A 
4-inch pulsometer was brought into service, but it was found to be 
insufficient to control the leakage. 

Blasting was necessary in two of the coffer-dam sections where 
ledge was encountered. 

The trench was 17 feet in depth on the Mattapan side of the 
river, the bottom 5 feet being in rock for a distance of about 60 
feet. The excavation in the river extended about 5 feet below the 
river bed. 

On both sides of the river are retaining walls through which the 
sewer structure had to be built. The wall on the Boston side, 



60 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

which had been topped up with timber, was in a dilapidated con- 
dition. As left, it is in a much better condition than when the 
sewer operations were begun. 

Progress. — The work was begun June 7, 1897; finished Sept. 
7, 1897. 

Cost. 

Labor and teaming, f 2,686 67 

Coal for pumping, 69 44 

Iron pipe, 183 84 

Akron pipe, 88 83 

Lumber, 313 29 

Brick, 47 50 

Cement, 216 46 

Miscellaneous items, including gravel, tools, oil, man-hole frames and 

covers, nails, blacksmith work, etc , 207 48 

$3,813 50 
Cement Testing. 

Approximately 20,000 barrels of cement have been used during 
the year, in the proportions of about 7,000 barrels of Portland 
cement to about 13,000 barrels of American cement. 

The cement, which has been of the best English and American 
brands, has been carefully tested for fineness, tensile strength, 
specific gravity, checking, cracking, etc., about 5,000 tests having 
been made. 

Table of Progress. 

The following table recapitulates to some extent the detailed 
information given in the foregoing pages and in reports of preced- 
ing years. The Charles River Valley sections are designated by 
letters and those of the North Metropolitan and Neponset Valley 
areas by numbers. 

Where work on the same section has continued through two or 
more years some statistics and other statements contained in 
former reports have been repeated for convenience of reference. 
This is desirable, among other reasons, on account of the great 
scarcity of some of the earlier reports. 

The foregoing detailed reports of sections are in general con- 
densed from those of the various assistant engineers directly con- 
nected with the work. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



61 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



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1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45 



67 



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68 METEOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

Office and General Assistants. 

In addition- to the assistant engineers and other assistants above 
referred to, the following have been employed for the whole and 
parts of the year : — 

Assistant Engineers : — 

Charles H. Swan,* special hydraulic studies and calculations. 

"VVinslow Blanchard,* mechanical studies, maintenance and equipment of pumping 
stations. 

Frederick D. Smith, in charge of contract construction and maintenance, Neponset 
Valley System. 

Frank I. Capen, in charge of day work and contract construction, and mainten- 
ance studies. 

Francis L. Sellew, in charge of surveys and draughting. 

Charles E. Hathaway, in charge of records. 
Assistants on Mainte7iance Studies. — Theodore Horton, B. A. Clark,t E. W. Brown. 
Assistants emploj/ed on Surveys. — A. G. Adams,t H. L. Morrow,t J. C. Bell.f 
Draughtsmen : — 

William J. Watkins.f 

Frank A. Emery. 

Arthur H. Pratt.f 

Harry C. Dove.f 

Richard J. McNulty. 

I. M. Beard.f 
Stenographer. — Henry P. Fielding. 
Cement Tester. — Nelson A. Hallett.t 
Messenger. — Madison C. Lewis. 

* Engaged for a part of his time only, and for but a portion of the year, by the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Commission. 
t For a portion of the year. 
X Engaged for a portion of his time only by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 69 



MAINTENANCE. 

Tlie INIetropolitan Sewerage Works comprise three distinct sys- 
tems or groups of main iutercepting sewers. Tiie North Metro- 
politan System is mainly in the valley of the Mystic River, and 
discharges into the sea at Deer Island ; the Charles River Valley 
System, along the southerly shore of the Charles River, connects 
with the Boston Main Drainage Works at Gainsborough Street ; 
the Neponset River Valley System, in the valleys of Mother Brook 
and the Neponset River, connects with the Boston Main Drainage 
Works in Dorchester. The sewage from the two latter systems is 
carried to Moon Island, together with the sewage of Boston, and 
is there discharged into the sea. 

North Metropolitan System. — The North Metropolitan System 
provides an outlet for the sewers of Woburn, Stoneham, Winches- 
ter, Arlington, Belmont, part of Wakefield, Somerville, Cambridge, 
Medford, Melrose, Maiden, Everett, Chelsea, Charlestown, East 
Boston and Winthrop. It consists of about 46 miles of main and 
branch lines of intercepting sewers. The most distant point is 
about 18 miles from the outlet at Deer Island, near the line between 
Stoneham and Woburn. Commencing at this point as a 15-inch pipe, 
about 47 feet above mean low water, the sewer passes through Win- 
chester, crossing the Abbajona River by a 20-inch masonry siphon, 
and through part of Medford, gradually increasing in size to 40 by 
42 inches at West Medford, where it is about 8 feet above mean 
low water. Here it receives the sewage of the Alewife Brook 
branch, which conveys sewage from Arlington, Belmont and parts 
of Cambridge, Somerville and Medford. The Alewife Brook branch 
begins as a 15-inch pipe in Belmont, at an elevation of about 7 feet 
above mean low water, and increases in size to 36 by 43 inches near 
the Mystic River, where its elevation is about 2J feet below mean 
low water. The sewage is here raised about 13.5 feet to the 
upper-level sewer by centrifugal pumps at the Alewife Brook 
pumping station. After passing under the Mystic River in a 
24-inch masonry siphon, it flows into the main intercepter at West 
Medford. Below West Medford the intercepter passes through 
Medford Square, along Riverside Avenue, through the marshes 
near Wellington to Maiden River, increasing to 56 by 61 inches. 



70 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

It passes Maiden River by a 42-inch masonry siphon reinforced 
with wooden hoops and resting on piles. 

In Everett, east of Maiden River, the sewer receives the branch 
line from Maiden and Melrose. The size is here increased to 70 by 
76 inches, which it retains until it receives the branch sewer from 
Cambridge. The sewer is here about 6 feet below mean low water. 

The Cambridge branch intercepter conveys the sewage from 
most of Cambridge and Somerville, part of Medford and all of 
Charlestown. It begins 27 by 28 inches in diameter in the west 
side of Cambridge, near Mt. Auburn, at an elevation of about 
5.5 feet above mean low water, and extends along the northerly 
shore of the Charles River to Portland Street, Cambridge ; through 
Portland Street, the grounds formerly of the McLean Asylum, 
Somerville, and Sullivan Square, Charlestown, to the southerly side 
of the Mystic River, where it increases to 79 by 89 inches, passing 
under the river by a 60-inch masonry siphon. 

On the northerly side of the Mystic River is the Charlestown 
pumping station, where the sewage of the Cambridge branch is 
raised by submerged centrifugal pumps about 8 feet to the upper 
intercepter, which unites with the main intercepter in Everett. 

The latter continues through Everett and Chelsea, increasing in 
size to 100 by 110 inches at Chelsea Creek. The sewer passes 
under Chelsea Creek by a-67-inch masonry siphon. The principal 
branch sewer from East Boston unites with the main on the south- 
erly side of Chelsea Creek. 

The East Boston pumping station is located just south of Chelsea 
Creek. All the sewage of the main line is here raised about 15 
feet by submerged centrifugal pumps. The sewer at this point is 
nearly circular and 109 inches in diameter. The main sewer passes 
under Belle Isle Inlet by a masonry siphon in three channels, each 
57 inches in diameter, only one of the channels being at present 
in use. It then resumes its former size, and continues through 
Winthrop to Shirley Gut, which it crosses by means of a 73-inch 
masonry siphon. 

The sewer on Deer Island, between Shirley Gut and the pump- 
ing station, is 109 inches in diameter. The elevation of the sewer 
at the pumping station is about 7.6 feet below mean low water. 
The sewage is here raised by means of submerged centrifugal 
pumps. The lift varies with the stage of the tide, being about 
11 feet on an average, with a maximum lift of about 20 feet. 

The outfall sewer into which the pumps discharge is 6 feet wide, 
and varies in height from 10 feet at the pumping station to 6 feet 
at the shore. It is continued about 1,800 feet beyond the shore 
line to a point near the Deer Island light-house, where it turns 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 71 

upwards and discharges the sewage into the sea. This discharge 
is continuous through all stages of the tide. 

Charles Ulcer S/jstem. — The Charles River System provides an 
outlet for the local sewers of Waltham, Watertown, most of New- 
ton, Brighton, most of Brookline and a part of the'Back Bay district 
of Boston. It consists of about 8 miles of intercepting sewers. The 
upper end in Waltham is 42 by 48 inches and about 21 feet above 
mean low water. It follows generally along the southerly side of 
the Charles River to the corner of Gainsborough Street and Hunt- 
ington Avenue in Boston, where it is 78 inches in diameter and 
about 5 feet below mean low water. Below this point the sewage 
flows by gravity through the sewers of the Boston Main Drainage 
Worivs, is pumped with the Boston sewage and is discharged into 
Boston harbor at Moon Island. 

Neponset Valley System. — The Neponset Valley System pro- 
vides an outlet for the local sewers of districts in West Roxbury, 
Dedham, Hyde Park, Milton and Dorchester. It is expected that 
those districts of Newton and Brookline which cannot be connected 
with the Charles River Valley System will eventually be made a 
part of the Neponset Valley System, as they naturally drain to it. 
The sewage will ultimately be discharged into the sewers of the 
Boston Main Drainage Works in Dorchester, near Granite bridge, 
and be pumped with the Boston sewage and discharged at Moon 
Island in Boston harbor. The system now consists of about 10 
miles of intercepting sewers. The upper end in West Roxbury 
on Weld Street, near the Brookline town line, is 15 inches in diam- 
eter and about 116 feet above mean low water. It follows south- 
erly in private lands in the brook valley to Newfield Street, through 
St. Joseph's Cemetery and along the Brookline water works' tak- 
ing to a point on the northerly shore of the Charles River at Gard- 
ner Street, near the Brookline waterworks pumping station, thence 
along the northerly shore of the Charles River, Mother Brook and 
the Neponset River through West Roxbury, Dedham and Hyde 
Park. In the lower part of Hyde Park its size is 54 by 55 inches 
and its elevation is about 31 feet above mean low water. 

It is expected that before many years the portion of this system 
above the lower part of Hyde Park will be made a branch of a high- 
level gravity sewer yet to be built. 

Through Dorchester to Central Avenue the sewer is made to 
conform to the capacity of the Dorchester Intercepter, which forms 
a temporary outlet for the part of the Neponset System above the 
future point of connection with the high-level gravity sewer ; it is 
about 36 inches in diameter, and at Central Avenue is about 20 
feet above mean low water. 



72 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

The maintenaDce of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works involves 
the operation of the four pumping stations, the care of the 65 miles 
of intercepting sewers, siphons and other connected structures, 
and engineering studies for extensions and care of the works. A 
detailed statement in relation to maintenance follows. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

The pumping plants at all the stations have been in continuous 
operation during the year and are now in excellent condition. The 
quantity of sewage pumped has very largely increased during the 
year, due to a more extended use of the system by the tributary 
cities and towns. The following table gives data in relation to the 
connected areas : — 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



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74 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Approximately 364 miles of local sewers are now connected 
with this system, used by 193,000 people, or about 50 per cent, 
of the total resident population on the area. All the cities and 
towns within the area have made some use of the system except 
Wakefield. The quantity of sewage pumped at each station is 
indicated in the accompanying tables, together with lifts and 
pump duties : — 

Table of Approximate Quantities and Lifts, Deer Island Pumping Station^ 

North Metropolitan System. 



MONTHS. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 

per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 
Duty (Million 

ft -lbs. per 
100 lbs. Coal). 


1896-97. 

October, 
November, . 
December, . 
January, 
February, . 
March, . 
April, . 
May, 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, . 


561,645,000 

642,812,000 

816,606,000 

943,664,000 

1,024,692,000 

1,161,790,000 

1,138,564,000 

1,014,433,000 

1,126,530,000 

1,075,373,000 

1,125,568,000 

978,254,000 


18,118,000 
21,427,000 
26,342,000 
30,441,000 
36,596,000 
37,477,000 
37,952,000 
32,724,000 
37,551,000 
34,699,000 
36,309,000 
32,609,000 


13,331,000 
14,090,000 
21,050,000 
23,996,000 
27,758,000 
30,756,000 
31,494,000 
28,788,000 
28,788,000 
29,066,000 
32,216,000 
22,708,000 


30,218,000 
31,350,000 
40,508,000 
44,530,000 
55,380,000 
45,920,000 
55,768,000 
41,;^30,C00 
64,256,000 
43,894,000 
47,134,000 
41,734,000 


10.78 
10.66 
10.85 
10.62 
11.12 
10.91 
10.72 
10.87 
10.99 
10.80 
10.85 
10.84 


46,600,000 
53,500,000 
62,100,000 
66,130,000 
75,500,000 
65,700,000 
62,900,000 
55,800,000 
59,800,000 
63,400,000 
66,300,000 
60,000,000 


Total, 


11,609,931,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 


- 


31,853,000 


25,337,000 


45,169,000 


10.83 


61,478,000 



Table of Approximate Quantities and Lifts, East Boston Pumping Station, 

North Metropolitan System. 



MONTHS. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 
Duty (Million 

ft. -lbs. per 
100 lbs. Coal). 


1896-97. 

October, 
November, . 
December, . 
January, 
February, . 
March, . 
April, . 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, . 


509,994,000 
584,048,000 
754,606,000 
881,664,000 
968,692,000 

1,115,290,000 

1,093,564,000 
977,937,000 

1,081,530,000 
991,235,000 

1,041,434,000 
896,834,000 


16,451,000 
19,468,000 
24,342,000 
28,441,000 
34,596,000 
35,977,000 
36,452,000 
31,546,000 
36,051,000 
31,975,000 
33,595,000 
29,894,000 


12,119,000 
12,790,000 
19,050,000 
21,996,000 
25,758,000 
29,256,000 
29,994,000 
25,956,000 
27,288,000 
26,352,000 
29,502,000 
24,800,000 


27,471,000 
28,400,000 
38,508,000 
42,530,000 
53,380,000 
44,420,000 
54,268,000 
39,830,000 
62,756.000 
41,180,000 
44,420,000 
39,020,000 


14.36 
14.26 
14.59 
15.05 
15.22 
14.84 
15.09 
14.68 
14.69 
14.90 
14.97 
15.12 


39,900,000 
45,300,000 
51,540,000 
57,210,000 
60,200.000 
61,400,000 
61,200,000 
53,600,000 
55,700,000 
62,700,000 
62,600,000 
59,200,000 


Total, 


10,898,828,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 


- 


29,899,000 


23,738,000 


43,015,000 


14.81 


55,879,000 



1808.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



75 



Table of Approximale Quantities and Lifts, Charlestown Pumping Sta- 
tion, North Metropolitan System. 



MONTHS. 


Total 
Pumpase 
(Gallonn). 


Average 
per I):tv 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 
Duty (Million 

ft. -lbs per 
100 lbs. Coal). 


1H06-97. 

October, 

November, . 
December, . 
January, 
February, . 
March, , 
April, . 
May, 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, . 


313,348,000 

374,401,000 

497,842,000 

618,839,000 

630,718,000 

699,312,000 

692,478,000 

696,074,000 

752,544,000 

1 770,070,000 

1 823,660,000 

665,169,000 

7,534,455,000 


10,108,000 
12,480,000 
16,059,000 
19,963,000 
22,526,000 
22,558,000 
23,082,000 
22,454,000 
25,085,000 
24,841,000 
26,569,000 
22,172,000 


8,078,000 
8,250,000 
11,200,000 
16,234,000 
16,387,000 
18,216,000 
17,301,000 
17,149,000 
17,758,000 
20,416,000 
22,000,000 
14,866,000 


20,661,000 
20,000,000 
28,113,000 
31,802,000 
42,826.000 
.30,580,000 
41,836,000 
29,014,000 
44,212,000 
34,266,000 
35,400,000 
31,000,000 


7.72 
7.82 
7.97 
7.88 
7.94 
7.40 
8.15 
8.17 
8.24 
8.50 
7.84 
7.13 


34,000,000 
40,800,000 
49,990,000 
55,640,000 
54,500,000 
55,400,000 
58,400,000 
58,100,000 
61,300,000 
68,800,000 
70,800,000 
64.500,000 


Total, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 


- 


20,658,000 


15,655,000 


32,476,000 


7.90 


56,019,000 



Table of Approximate Quantities and Lifts, Alewife Brook Pumping Sta- 
tion, Noi'th Metropolitan System. 



MONTSS. 


Total 

Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 

per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 
Duty (Million 

ft. -lbs. per 
100 lbs Coal). 


1896-97. 

October, 


46,977,000 


1,515,000 


1,034,000 


3,231,000 


12.51 


9.640,000 


November, . 


49,744,000 


1,658,000 


1,165,000 


2,718,000 


12.58 


9,770,000 


December, . 


70,564,000 


2,276,000 


1,783,000 


4,196,000 


11.65 


13,140,000 


January, 


74,711,000 


2,410,000 


1,580,000 


3,526,000 


11.79 


13,600,000 


February, . 


80,867,000 


2,888,000 


2,120,000 


4,085,000 


11.76 


15,430,000 


March, . 


107,423,000 


3,465,000 


2,645,000 


4,554,000 


11.81 


19,100,000 


April, . 


101,716,000 


3,391,000 


2,598,000 


4,677,000 


13.02 


21,700,000 


May, . . 


79,661,000 


2,569,000 


1,994,000 


3,622,000 


13.17 


17,600,000 


June, . 


87,653,000 


2,922,000 


1,868,000 


4,860,000 


12.92 


18,000,000 


July, . 


75,257,000 


2,428,000 


1,951,000 


3,730,000 


12.93 


15,000,000 


August, 


82,209,000 


2,652,000 


1,952,000 


3,968,000 


12.90 


15,900,000 


September, . 


68,509,000 


2,284,000 


1,741,000 


3,379,000 


12.95 


15,350,000 


Total, 


925,291,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 


- 


2,538,000 


1,869,000 


3,879,000 


12.50 


15,352,000 



76 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

In the fourth annual report (1893, pages 125-128) appears a 
graphic statement of quantities of sewage anticipated in future 
years at the North Metropolitan pumping stations. The issue of 
this report being now exhausted, the diagrams and explanatory 
text are here reproduced for comparison with quantities pumped 
during the past year : — 

Estimated Quantity of Sewage. 

The sizes of sewers in the preliminary design of the Metropolitan 
System were based on the estimates of iDopulution made by the State 
Board of Health (see Senate Doeun»ent No. 2, January, 1889, page 41). 
These estimates were based upon the census of 1885 and those of earlier 
}c'ars. After the work of construction of the system was begun the 
ligures derived from tiie census of 189u showed that the population of 
the district was growing more rapidly than had been indicated by the 
earlier cens^us. The estimate of the population in 1930 was therefore 
revised and increased. The estimated amount of sewage for 1930, as 
given in the above-mentioned Senate Document, is about 10 per cent, 
less than that tinally adopted. The sizes of the sewers in our system 
have been accordingly increased, adding somewhat to the cost of con- 
struction. 

The maximum rate of flow is taken at 35 cubic feet, or 262 gallons, 
])er head per day for Somerville and Cambridge, and at 30 cubic feet, 
or 224 gallons, per head per day for all other cities and towns. 

The average rate of flow is taken at 110 gallons per head per day 
for the population of 1890 and at 120 gallons per head per day for the 
anticipated population of 1930, the population and rate of flow being 
considered to increase at a uniform ratio between these years. 

The minimum rate of flow is taken at two-thirds the average flow in 
dry seasons. This ratio is derived from some observations upon the 
flow of sewers in Providence. The average flow in dry seasons is 
estimated at 117 gallons per head per day in city districts, and at 85 
gallons per head per day in suburban districts (see page 95 of the 
above-mentioned Senate Uocumentj. The mininmm rate of flow is 
therefore taken at 78 gallons per head per da}' for Boston, Charlestown, 
East Boston, Chelsea, Somerville and Cambridge, and at 57 gallons per 
head ptr day for all the other cities and towns. Reports of the flow of 
sewage at the Boston main drainage pumping station indicate that the 
minimum rate of flow in 18«9 at that place was about &2 gallons per 
head per day. The rates of flow of sewage at the several pumping 
stations are computed on the supposition that the entire estimated popu- 
lation is connected with the sewers. 

Appended diagrams show the estimated rates of flow for a period of 
forty years at the pumping stations of the North Metropolitan System 
in cubic feet per second and also in million gallons per twenty-four 
hours. 



1808.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



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METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



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80 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



At all stations except Charlestown the anticipated quantities 
have exceeded actual amounts pumped. At Charlestown the ex- 
cess is largely manufacturing wastes, for which special payments 
are made and which will probably be much reduced in the future. 

Cost of Pumping. 

The quantities of sewage handled at the large stations during the 
latter half of the year exceed 50 per cent, of the working capaci- 
ties of the pumps. The average cost per million foot-gallons, 
shown in the accompanying tables, is commendably low, com- 
paring favorably with results obtained from high-grade recipro- 
cating pumps. During the first half of the year the pumping was 
light. It may reasonably be anticipated that the present cost per 
million foot-gallons will be considerably reduced in future years. 

Deer Island and East Boston Pumping Stations, 

At each station are two submerged centrifugal pumps, 8.25 feet 
in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines of the Reynolds- 
Corliss type ; both pumps and engines were specially designed and 
erected by the Edward P. Allis Company of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Nominal capacity of pumps : 45,000,000 gallons each, with 12-foot and 16-foot lifts 

respectively at Deer Island and East Boston. 
Average duty for the year : 61,000,000 and 56,000,000 foot-pounds respectively. 
Average quantity raised each day : 32,000,000 and 30,000,000 gallons respectively. 
Force employed at each station : 3 engineers, 3 screenmen, 3 firemen and 1 jeliefman. 
Coal used : first-quality Cumberland, costing from f 2.76 to f 3.05 per ton. . 



Average Yearly Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at Deer 

Island Station. 

Annual Volume (11,610 Million Gallons) xLift (10.83 Feet)=126,736 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
Total 



$6,391 65 
2,459 63 
330 69 
42 92 
457 20 
140 02 
993 84 



).0509* 
.0196 
.0026 
.0003 
.0036 
.0011 
.0079 



$10,815 95 



$0.0860 



* Includes labor at screens j deducting this item gives cost of labor $0.0383. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



81 



Average Yearly Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at East 

Boston Station. 

Annual Volume (10,896 Million Gallons) xLift (14.81 Feet)=161,370 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




CoPt 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste 

Water 

Packing, 

MiscellaneouB supplies and reuewalf , 
Total 



$6,674 98 

3,482 11 

380 56 

42 03 

715 20 

74 17 

1,098 21 



$12,467 26 



$0.0413* 
.0216 
.0024 
.0003 
.0044 
.0005 
.0068 



$0.0773 



♦ Includes labor at screens; deducting this item gives cost of labor $0.0333. 

To compare these results with cost of pumping elsewhere, the 
following statement, compiled from figures given in the twenty- 
first annual report of the City Engineer of Boston for the year 
1887, page 25, is given : — 



Leavitt High-duty Reciprocating Pumps, Old Harbor Point 
Station, Boston Main Drainage Works. 

Analysis of Cost of Primping Sewage. 

(See Report of the City Engineer of Boston for the year 1887.) 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost per Million 
Foot-gallons. 



Approx- 
imately. 



Say 



Labor, . 
Coal, . 
Water, . 
Valves, . 
Gasoline, 
Oil, 

Packing, 
Waste, . 
Renewals, 
Total, 



$17,334 96 

8,687 48 

711 60 

838 82 

529 05 

500 22 

198 61 

49 12 

3,316 84 



$32,166 70 



Cents. 
3.16 

1.58 

0.13 

0.15 

0.09 

0.09 

0.04 

0.01 

0.60 



5.85 



Cents. 
3.2 

1.6 



0.5 



0.6 



5.9 



CcT ts. 
3.0 

2.0 



0.5 



0.5 

6.0 



Annual volume=43,630,657X365 gallons. 

Average lift:=34.54 feet. 

Corresponding duty, 99,560,000 foot-pounds. 



82 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



This record is for the well-known Leavitt engine of the com- 
pound, beam and fly-wheel type, specially designed to give a high 
degree of economy in the consumption of coal. The engine was 
practically new, and operated under most favorable conditions. 
The published duty of nearly 100,000,000 foot-pounds has not 
since been exceeded. 

The last published average yearly duty for the Boston Main 
Drainage Station from the report of the Superintendent of Streets 
for the year ending Jan. 31, 1896, was approximately 68,000,000 
foot-pounds before correcting for 14 to 17 per cent, of slip. 

Charlestown Pumping Station, 

At this station are two submerged centrifugal pumps, 7.5 feet 
in diameter, driven by triple-expansion Reynolds-Corliss engines ; 
both pumps and engines were specially designed and erected by 
the Edward P. Allis Company of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Nominal capacity of pumps : 22,000,000 gallons each, with 8-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year : 56,000,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day : 21,000,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 screenmen, 3 firemen and 1 reliefman. 

Coal used : first-quality Cumberland, costing from ^2.79 to $3.05 per ton. 



Average Yearly Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at Charles- 
town Station. 

Annual Volume (7,534 Million Gallons) xLift (7.9 Feet)=59,519 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor 

Coal, 

Oil, 

Waste 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
Total, 



^6,497 68 

1,449 97 

386 41 

47 73 

243 30 

46 36 

961 74 



$9,633 19 



$0.1092 
.0244 
.0065 
.0008 
.0041 
.0008 
.0162 

$0.1620 



Because of the low lift and the relatively small quantity of 
sewage raised, the cost for labor per million foot-gallons at this 
station must always exceed that at Deer Island and East Boston, 
since the continuous service and the necessities of the house require 
a force as numerous as at the larger stations. 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



83 



Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 

The plant consists of small commercial pumps and engines, — 
two 9-iiich Andrews vertical centrifugal pumps, with direct-con- 
nected compound marine engines. 

Capacity of pumps : 4,500,000 jjallons each, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 15,000,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day : 2,540,000 ijallons. 

Force employed ; 2 engineers working 12-hour shifts each. 

Coal used : first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.43 to $4.07 per ton. 

Average Yearly Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at Alewife 

Brook Station. 

Anniml Volume (925 Million QallonB)xLift (12.5 Feet)=ll,562 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Co8t per 

Million Foot- 

galluDS. 



Labor 

Coal, 

Oil. ... ... 

Waste, 

'Wat«T, 

Packing, 

MiHcellarieous Buppliee and renewals, 

Total 



$2,362 64 

1,073 15 

218 39 

21 22 

86 80 

11 76 

393 64 



$4,167 60 



$0.2044 
.0928 
.0188 
.0019 
.0075 
.0010 
.0340 



$0.3605 



The cost per million foot-gallons is largely for labor. This 
could not be reduced if a high-grade, specially designed plant 
were used, as two men now attend the plant for 24 hours. The 
small economy in coal that might be obtained from a high-duty 
plant would, if capitalized, be offset by the increased cost of such 
a plant. Owing to the very small quantity of sewage raised and 
the low lift, the cost per million foot-gallons here must always con- 
siderably exceed that at the larger stations. 

Additional Pumps needed. 
Deer Idand and East Boston Pumping Stations. 
An examination of the tables of quantities pumped during the 
year at these stations indicates that for the last six months the 
average daily service is within 10,000,000 gallons of the capacity 
of a single pump. Large additional areas in East Boston, Chelsea 
and Charlestown are now about to be connected with the system, 
which will yield probably 20,000,000 gallons per day, thus placing 
the average dry-weather service of the coming year at fully the 
maximum capacity of a single pump, necessitating the constant 
operation of both pumps in case of storm or the larger deliveries 
of the winter months. 



84 METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [J.m. 

Experience in the erection of the existing pumping plants indi- 
cates that under the most favorable conditions two years will prob- 
ably be needed to carry out the necessary construction for, and 
erection of, additional pumps. 

Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station the table of quantities indicates that the average 
daily service has already exceeded the nominal capacity of one 
pump. Both pumps are now operated for a considerable time in 
wet weather. A large additional area in Charlestown, tributary to 
this station, is soon to be connected with the system. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 

The average daily service at this station now approximates 
3,000,000 gallons. 

Chapter 520 of the Acts of 1897 provides for the addition of the 
town of Lexington to that part of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
System tributary to the Alewife Brook Pumping Station. The 
addition will probably be made during the coming year. This 
provides for considerable areas in Arlington ; and the leading 
main to Lexington as designed is of considerable length through 
wet country that will yield a large amount of ground water. It is 
anticipated that this extension must increase the quantity received 
at the station 1,500,000 gallons per day. In winter and during 
storms this will necessitate continuous operation of both of the 
existing pumps after the Lexington extension is connected. 

Appropriations recommended. 
It is recommended that additional appropriations for purchasing 
pumps and carrying out the necessary construction be requested, 
as follows : — 

Deer Island Pumping Station : — 
For the construction of a fourth pit, the erection at Pit No. 3 of one 
engine and pump and the introduction of a battery of two boilers, 
the engine, pump and boilers to be of the same general type and 
size as those at present in service at this station, .... $43,000 00 

East Boston Pumping Station : — 
For the construction of a fourth pit, the erection at Pit No. 3 of one 
engine and pump and the introduction of a battery of two boilers, 
the engine, pump and boilers to be of the same general type and 
size as those at present in service at this station, .... $44,000 00 

Charlestown Pumping Station : — 
For the erection at Pit No. 3 of an engine and pump of the same 
general type and size as at present in service at Deer Island and 
East Boston, the enlargement of the suction and discharge pas- 
sages and the introduction of a battery of two boilers of the same 
general type and size as those at present in service at this station, $46,000 00 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 85 

The existing pit at the Charlestown station is of sufficient size to 
receive the large pump ; the house itself has the same width as that 
at East Boston. With the very low lift at this station the large 
pump will have a capacity of 100,000,000 gallons per day, or the 
full carrying capacity of the discharge sewer. 

The introduction of a large pump at this house will result in a 
considerable saving in cost by avoiding the construction of a fourth 
pit, which at this station would be very expensive, and the enlarg- 
ing of the engine-room itself. It will further effect considerable 
economy and convenience in maintenance. 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station : — 
For the cunsiruction and erection of one vertical centrifugal pump, 
a direct-connected compound vertical engine and one 100-horse- 
power hoiizontiil tul)uiar boiler, this additional plant to have a 
capacity of 13,U(»,0()0 gallons on a 13-foot lift and a guaranteed 
duty of 5U,0U0,0J0 foot-pounds, $9,500 00 

The proposed new pump at the Alewife Brook station is de- 
signed to have the full carrying capacity of the discharge sewer. 
It will be needed only in case the extension to Lexington is built. 
If the Lexington extension is not built, the existing pumps are 
estimated to be sullicient for the ordinary extensions of the next 
five years. 

Total appropriation recommended for additional pumping ma- 
chinery, $142,500. 

Electric Lighting Plants. 

During the year electric lighting has been introduced at East 
Boston and Deer Island stations, as follows ; — 

East Boston Pmnjnng Station. 

The plant at this station consists of belt-connected generator 
and high-speed engine. The dynamo is of the direct-current, 
multi-polar type, of 1^ kilowatt capacity and of the Eddy Man- 
ufacturing Company's make. 

The engine is an automatic Westinghouse machine, with 5J-inch 
cylinder and 5-inch stroke, rated at 10 horse-power. It was owned 
by the commission and has been thoroughly repaired. 

The station has been wired for 60 incandescent lamps in 5 
circuits, lighting the engines, boilers, coal-house, screen-room and 
toilet-rooms, controlled from switches located on a central switch- 
board in the dynamo-room. 



8Q METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. [Jan. 

Cost. 

Repairs to Westinghouse engine, $71 00 

Generator, G. M. Angier & Co., 247 50 

Wiring and installing, James Wilkinson & Co., 21100 

Foundations and pipe connections, . . 252 79 

$782 29 
Deer Island Pumping Station. 

The plant at this station consists of a belt-connected generator 
and a high-speed engine. 

The djmamo is of the direct-current, multi-polar type, of 15 kilo- 
watt capacity and of the Eddy Manufacturing Company's make. 

The engine is an Armington & Sims high-speed machine, with 
6^-inch cylinder and 8-inch stroke, rated at 18 horse-power. This 
engine, though not entirely new, had been used but very little and 
was in excellent condition when purchased. 

The plant has a capacity of 200 16-candle-power incandescent 
lamps. The station has been wired for 77 lamps in 6 circuits, 
lighting the engines, boilers, coal-house, screen-room and toilet- 
rooms, controlled from switches located on a central switch-board 
in the dynamo-room. Provision has been made and a switch 
placed on the switch-board for controlling a circuit which in the 
future may be extended into the employees' dwelling-house located 
near the station. 

Cost. 

Armington & Sims engine, Jas. H. Roberts & Co., $175 00 

Generator, G. M. Angier & Co., 337 60 

Wiring and installing, H. N. Bates Machine Company, .... 20000 

Foundations and pipe connections, 206 50 

$919 00 

Maintenance of Sewers and Special Structures. 

For the care of 42 miles of sewers and connected special struct- 
ures in the North Metropolitan System a permanent force is em- 
ployed, consisting of a foreman, 5 sub-foremen, 16 men and 4 
horses and teams. As needed, additional men are temporarily 
employed. This force inspect and maintain regulators and con- 
nections, clean and flush the sewers when needed, remove ashes 
and screenings from the stations, maintain the station buildings 
and grounds, clean sand-catchers and flush siphons as needed and 
maintain a ferry at Shirley Gut. During the year the surface over 
the sewer in private lands has been graded and otherwise improved. 

The cost of the above work, with necessary supplies for the 
year, has been $21,666.85. 

Condition of the Sewers. 

The sewers are now clean and in first-class condition. Some 
flushing has been required on the Mystic Valley Sewer, acquired of 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 87 

the city of Boston, costing for the year $195. In the upper ends 
of the branch lines, where the flow is still slight, particularly where 
njanufactiuing wastes are delivered, some flushing and hand-clean- 
ing in the sewers was required, costing for the year S200. 

During the year the following quantity of sand and other mate- 
rial has been taken from the sand-catchers at the places named : — 

Material taken from Sand-catchers at Siphons, North Metropolitan 

System. 



Location of Sand-catcheb. 



Shirley (hit 

Belle l8le Inlet 

ChelBcn Creek, 

MjHtic lilver (Charleelowti), .... 

Maiden River, 

MyHiic Ulver (rioraervllle, near Boston Avenue), 

Abbftjona lilver, 

Lake Street 

Total 



Cubic Yards 
renooved. 



2.1 

26.5 
29.9 

3.0 
27.3 
11.0 
10.0 

3.0 



112.8 



Observations of Losses of Head at Siphons ; Condition of 
Deer Island Bar and Outfall. 

Careful observations of losses of head at all the siphons have 
been made at frequent intervals during the year. The observa- 
tions indicate that no appreciable deposits have thus far occurred. 

The Deer Island bar at the outlet is free from deposit and the 
outfall itself is in a satisfactory condition. 

Time required by Sewage from Various Localities to pass 

THROUGH THE METROPOLITAN SeWERS TO THE OuTFALL NEAR 

Deer Island Light. 

The time of sewage passing through the Metropolitan System to 
the outlet at Deer Island from various locations in the area has 
been studied by means of surface floats. The mean of several 
observations is given in the table below. The sewers at the dates 
of observations had a depth of flow of from 13 to 36 per cent, of 
their vertical diameters. Eighty per cent, of the observed surface 
velocity has been taken as the mean velocity of the section. The 
observations do not sensibly disagree with results obtained from 
calculations based on theoretical velocities. 

It appears that tannery drainage from Woburn is delivered at 
the outfall in about 14 hours after being received into the Metro- 
politan Sewer ; from Stoneham, in about 15 hours ; and effluent 
from the packing houses in Somerville, in about 7 hours. 



88 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Table showing JResuUs of Float Measurements to determine Probable Time 
required by Sewage in passing from Various Points within the North 
Metropolitan Area to the Outfall near Deer Island Light. 

Main Line. 



Points from which Float Measurements 
were made. 



Distance to 

Outfall 

measured over 

Centre Line 

of iSewer. 



Time occupied 
by Floats iu 
passing from 

Given Points 
to Outfall. 



Stoneham : — 

ritoneham-Woburn line, Montvale Avenue, 

Woburn : — 

Baeder, Adamson & Co. (glue factory), . 
Woburn-Winchester line, 

Winchester : — 

Cross Street, Winchester Highlands 

Common Htreet, Winchester (Station 

Med ford : — 

Bellmouth, junction of old Mystic Valley Sewer and 
main line, opposite dam betweeu Upper and Lower 
Mystic lakes, 

Bellmoulh, Canal and Prescott streets. West Medford, 

Medford Square, 

Medford-Everett line, Maiden River siphon, 

Everett: — 

Bellraouth, near Faxon Street, West Everett, 
Belimouth, junction of Cambridge branch and main 

line near Everett Station, 

Everett-Chelsea line, 

Chelsea: — 

Chelsea Square, 

East Boston : — 

East Boston Pumping Station, 

East Boston-Winthrop line, Belle Isle Inlet siphon, . 

Winthrop : — 

Winthrop Beach Station, Washington Street, . 
Point Shirley, at Shirley Grut siphon, .... 

Deer Island : — 

Deer Idand Pumping Station, 

Outfall, Deer Island Light 



Hours. Minutes. 
15 30 



15 
14 



13 
11 



10 



4 

24 



15 

57 



54 
21 

57 

18 
43 

17 



34 
43 



40 

7 



35 



Belmont Branch, 



Belmont : — 

Belmont-Cambridge line, end of Belmont branch, 

Cambridge : — 

Belimouth, Rindge Avenue 




Alewife Brook Branch, 



Cambridge: — 

Concord Avenue, end of Alewife Brook branch, 
Massachusetts Avenue, at Alewife Brook, . 



Soraerville : — 

Broiidwaj', at Alewife Brook, 
Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 



Medford : — 

Belimouth, junction of Alewife Brook branch and 
main line, Canal and Prescott streets. 




11 
10 



10 
9 



34 

25 



3 
14 



54 



1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



8a 



Table showing Results oj Float Measurements^ etc. — Concluded. 

Melrose Branch. 



Points from which Float Measurements 
were made. 



Distance to 

Outfall 

measured over 

Centre Line 

of Sewer. 



Time occupied 
by Floats in 
passing from 2 

Given Points 
to Outfall. 



Melrose : — 

Junction of Wyoming Avenue and Pleasant Street, . 
Melrose-Malden line, 

Maiden : — 

Pleasant and Middlesex streets, . . 
Maiden-Everett line 

Everett : — 

Bellmoutb, opposite Faxon Street, West Everett, 




Hours. Minutes. 
9 1 

8 8 



18 
26 



57 



Cambridge Branch. 



Cambridge : — 

End of Cambridge line, corner Mt. Auburn and 

Lowell streets 

Elliot Square 

Binney and Portland streets, 

Cambridge and Warren streets 

Bomerville : — 

Somerville Avenue and Poplar Street, 

Charlestown : — 

Sullivan Square, 

Junction of Bomerville branch, foot of Arlington St., 

Charlestown Pumping Station, 

Bellmoutb, near Everett Station, 



14.15 

13.50 
10.95 
10.57 



10.28 



9.50 
9.30 
9.02 
8.10 



1 
9 


44 


7 


19 


7 


7 



50 



6 


9 


5 


57 


5 


47 


5 


18 



Somerville Branch. 



Somerville : — 

Somerville-Medford line. Mystic Avenue, 
Winthrop and Mystic avenues, 




53 

48 



The size of sewers ranges from 15-inch pipe to 9-foot brick; 
the depth of flow ranges from 0.25 to 3.30 feet ; the ratio of 
depth of flow to vertical diameter of sewer ranges from 13 to 36 
per cent. 

CHARLES RIVER VALLEY SYSTEM. 

Approximately 226 miles of local sewers are now connected with 
this system, used by about 67,500 people, or 62.9 per cent, of the 
total population resident on the area. The following table gives 
additional facts in relation to the use of the Metropolitan Sewer by 
the tributary cities and towns : — 



90 



METKOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 





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1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 91 

During the year there has been expended for labor and supplies, 
in cleaning and maintaining the 8-|- miles of sewer and special 
structures, $1,659.49. 



NEPONSET VALLEY SYSTEM. 

The Neponset Valley Intercepting Sewer was opened into the 
Dorchester branch of the Boston Main Drainage Works on Aug. 
23, 1897, by the removal of the bulkhead at Central Avenue. The 
Metropolitan Sewer from Central Avenue to near the West Rox- 
bury line, 6.27 miles in length, is now (Sept. 30, 1897) discharg- 
ing into Boston's sewers. 

To date, 5 public connections from Hyde Park have been made 
with this system. Approximately 5 J miles of local sewers, with 
150 people in Hyde Park connected, are now tributary to this 
system. 

The cost of maintenance to date for labor and supplies is 
$207.23. 

ENGINEERING STUDIES AND SUPPLIES. 

Miscellaneous studies relating to all the systems have been 
made during the year, including preliminary study of a high-level 
sewer, and extensions to Wakefield, Stoneham and Lexington. 
Estimates and plans for additional pumps at all the stations have 
been prepared. Considerable study has been given to engine- 
records and flows in the sewers. Record maps of many of the 
completed contract sections have been made. 

The above work, with clerical service in Engineer's office, 
office supplies and the expense of maintenance of the office build- 
ing. No. 1 Mt. Vernon Street, has cost for the year $9,188.14. 

I desire to thank you for your continued courtesy and kindness 
during the year, and to express appreciation of the efficient service 
of all the employees in the engineering department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM M. BROWN, Jr., 

Chief Engineer and Superintendent. 



I 



APPENDIX. 



94 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



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1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



95 

















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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



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1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



99 






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1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



101 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



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112 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



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1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



113 



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114 



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1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



115 



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1898.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 



117 






CO 



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118 



METEOPOLITAN SEWERAGE. 



[Jan. 



Assets and Liabilities Sept. 30, 1897. 



row 



Assets. 

Office furniture, fittings and supplies, including fittings for 

field offices, stationery and railroad tickets, 
Engineering instruments and supplies. 
Engines, pumps, boilers, derricks, inclines, buckets, 

boats, dump-cars and heavy appliances, . 
Pumping station fixtures, tools and supplies. 

Miscellaneous tools, 

Engineers' field offices, sheds, barns and tool-houses, 

Miscellaneous supplies, 

Carts, express wagon, horse and harnesses, 
Stock yard and building. East Boston, . 
Land for stock yard, Hyde Park, . 

Vacant lots, Winthrop, 

Cash received as follows : — 

Balance Sept. 30, 1896, .... 
To sale of pile butts, wood, iron, etc., . 
sale of kerosene and naphtha, . 
sale of engineer and inspectors' field office, 
sale of house and lot, 63 Pearl Street, 
Chelsea, final payment, 

engineer's transit, 

laying pipe, etc., ..... 

use of incline plane, 

town of Hyde Park, expense of construct- 
ing man-hole, 

citj- of Boston, for one-half cost of man- 
hole, 

Boston Transit Commission, four tunnel 

trucks and 10,688 pounds track, . 
city of Medford, for pumping ground- 
water for underdrain, .... 



.$3,154 16 

85 36 

9 04 

80 00 

1,500 00 

125 00 

45 12 

25 00 

128 52 

50 00 

63 44 



f2,922 27 
2,181 75 

3,063 00 
6,310 78 

909 80 
1,495 00 
1,418 00 

350 00 
2,500 00 

167 00 
1,800 00 



. 109 50 
5,325 14 

$28,442 74 

There are numerous necessary plans, drawings, calculations and studies 
relating to the work to which no stated value can be assigned ; also about 
sixty-three miles of completed sewer, with pumping stations, siphons and 
other accessories necessary for operating the systems. 



1898.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 45. 119 



Liabilities. 
Amounts due contractors : — 

Reserved on estimates (sewers), $23,708 12 

Fraction of pay rolls (engineers) 727 35 

Fraction of pay rolls (laborers), 173 27 

Unpaid bills, miscellaneous, 1,560 18 



$26,168 92 



There are also amounts due contractors upon a very few sections of 
the work which will be paid on succeeding estimates or after the com- 
pletion of the contracts. 






?.•